CPAD 2019 in Madison Wisconsin

America/Chicago
Monona Terrace Convention Center

Monona Terrace Convention Center

Madison, Wisconsin
Andrey Elagin (University of Chicago) , Isobel Ojalvo (University Wisconsin Madison) , Jingke Xu (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) , Jonathan Asaadi (Syracuse) , Jonathan Asaadi (University of Texas Arlington) , Junqi XIE (Argonne National Laboratory) , Karl Berggren, Kimberly Palladino (University of Wisconsin-Madison) , Sally Seidel (University of New Mexico) , Verena Ingrid Martinez Outschoorn (University of Massachusetts Amherst) , juan estrada (fermilab)
Description
Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors
    • 08:00 09:00
      Registration
    • 09:00 11:30
      Plenary

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      • 09:00
        Welcome 15m
        Speaker: Kimberly Palladino (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
      • 09:15
        The Higgs as a tool for discovery 15m
        Speaker: Jim Hirschauer
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Dark Matter 15m
        Speaker: Jodi Cooley
        Slides
      • 09:45
        DE and Inflation Instrumentation BRN working group 15m
        Precision measurements of cosmic expansion and the large-scale distribution of matter transform the universe into a laboratory for studying fundamental physics. Measurements of the “late universe,” through Stage-III dark energy experiments and the “early universe” through the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) reveal a universe that is best described by the Lambda CDM concordance cosmological model. These measurements show that the evolution of the universe is governed by Dark Matter and Dark Energy, neither of which are constituents of the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Discoveries from planned Stage-IV programs will provide a path for further exploration of fundamental physics in the cosmos. After the completion of DESI, LSST, and the upcoming CMBS4, future observations will need to 1) survey larger volumes to measure a substantial number of spatial modes to improve cosmological measurement precision, 2) characterize spatial modes over a large range of scales for sensitivity to a full suite of cosmological parameters, and 3) map the universe across a broader range in redshift to directly measure the evolution of the cosmos across all epochs. The potential for these future surveys is unprecedented and requires investment into R&D now to develop enabling instrumentation. This talk describes the process we have followed for gathering community input and the priority research directions and related R&D that we have identified as needed to prepare for Stage V experiments.
        Speaker: Dr BRENNA FLAUGHER (Fermilab)
        Paper
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Exploring the Unknown 15m
        Speaker: Sarah Demers (Yale University)
        Slides
      • 10:15
        Neutrinos and Neutrino Mass 15m
        Speaker: Amy Conolly
        Slides
    • 11:30 11:40
      Coffee break
    • 11:40 12:30
      Plenary

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      • 11:40
        Photodetectors 12m
        Speaker: Junqi XIE (Argonne National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 11:52
        Quantum Sensors 12m
        Speaker: Tim Kovachy
        Slides
      • 12:04
        Noble Liquid detectors 12m
        Speaker: Dr Hugh Lippincott (UCSB)
        Slides
      • 12:16
        Trigger and DAQ 12m
        Speaker: Prof. Tulika Bose (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
    • 12:30 13:30
      Lunch Grand Terrace

      Grand Terrace

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
    • 13:30 14:15
      Plenary Meeting Rooms K-R

      Meeting Rooms K-R

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin

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      • 13:30
        Solid State and tracking 15m
        Speaker: Carl Haber
        Slides
      • 13:45
        Calorimetry 15m
        Speaker: Roger Rusack
        Slides
      • 14:00
        Readout and ASICs 15m
        Speaker: Mitch Newcomer
        Paper
        Slides
    • 14:15 15:00
      Plenary Townhall: BRN process

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    • 15:00 15:30
      Coffee break
    • 15:30 18:06
      Diverse Detectors Hall of Ideas E

      Hall of Ideas E

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      • 15:30
        Develop Radiation Hard Beam Monitor and Muon Spectroscopy by using Machine Learning for Intense Neutrino Target System 17m
        Fermilab hosts the world's most powerful neutrino beam facility, Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) and the future Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) at Fermilab, which will be even more powerful. The sensitivities of the long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments that use these beams require precise alignment and monitoring of the beam in a high radiation environment over long periods. We propose new stable, radiation-hard beam monitors to measure the profile of hadrons downstream of the neutrino production target and muons after the hadron absorber. We present the status of the R&D for improvements to the current ionization chambers used in the NuMI beamline, and R&D for a future radio-frequency-based detector which measures a gas permittivity shift due to ionization in a gas-filled resonator. We also present the status of the development of a new machine-learning-based algorithm to constrain the systematic uncertainty of the neutrino flux due to the beam instability using the data from these detectors.
        Speaker: Katsuya Yonehara (Fermilab)
        Slides
      • 15:47
        Physics with Precision Time Structure in On Axis Neutrino Beams 17m
        We propose to use a higher-frequency RF bunch structure for the primary proton beam on target and precision timing to select different energy and flavor spectra from a wide-band neutrino beam, based on the relative arrival times of the neutrinos with respect to the RF bunch structure. This `stroboscopic' approach is an alternative to techniques that select different neutrino energy spectra based on the angle with respect to the beam axis. This timing-based approach allows for the selection of varying energy spectra from the same on-axis detector, and applies equally to both the near and far detectors in an oscillation experiment. Energy and flavor discrimination of neutrinos produced by hadrons in-flight will require the proton bunch lengths on the order of 100 picoseconds and commensurate precision in the detector. Correlating neutrino events with the parent proton interaction is currently limited by the nanosecond-scale width of the proton bunches impinging on the target. We show that these limitations can be addressed by using two superconducting RF cavities to re-bunch the present 53.1 MHz RF bunch structure with a factor of 10 higher RF frequency, thus attaining the required shorter bunch length.
        Speaker: Evan Angelico (University of Chicago)
        Slides
      • 16:04
        Results from ACE: picosecond timing planes for future collider detectors 17m
        We report results from the Askaryan Calorimeter Experiment (ACE), which uses coherent microwave Cherenkov emission from showers passing through Alumina dielectric-loaded waveguides to provide timing fiducials of 2-3 ps per detector element. The "calorimeter" part of ACE is a historical misnomer, since it has a relatively high shower threshold of several hundred GeV. However, in the forward direction at a 100 TeV collider, beyond a pseudorapidity of 3 or 4, a ~10-cm thick timing plane of ACE elements will see any showering particle of Pt>10-30 GeV, providing ~1 picosecond timing resolution for photons, charged leptons, and even hadrons. In addition, at ~2m out from the vertex region, the picosecond timing gives shower core positions to 100 microns precision along the 1~m ACE elements. The corresponding angular resolution is 10 arcseconds in theta, along with 6 arcminute resolution in phi due to the 6mm width of the WR51 waveguide elements. ACE is an unconventional but potentially transformative detector technology which will be most relevant at the extremely-high center-of-mass energies on the future collider horizon. Picosecond or better timing, enabling true 4-D tracking, is crucial for reduction of pileup, a challenging problem at 100 TeV. ACE detectors are extremely simple in design, extremely rad-hard in operation, with extreme dynamic range, limited only by the digitizers in the back end. And as shower calorimeters, they may actually even be useful at the highest energies when other detector technologies have saturated.
        Speakers: Prof. Peter Gorham (High Energy Physics Group, UH Manoa) , Mr Remy Prechelt (High Energy Physics Group, UH Manoa)
        Slides
      • 16:21
        Artificially Structured Materials for HEP Detector Applications 17m
        Artificially structured materials, also called meta-materials are composite media that can emerge with unusual electromagnetic properties. Owing to Transformation Optics (TO) a wide spectrum of electromagnetic devices with extraordinary pre-designed functions enters the stage. As the development of meta-materials progresses, many of novel electromagnetic devices designed with TO have been experimentally demonstrated and used in specific applications. As an example, a magnetic cloaking device has been developed and verified upon feasibility by our group. It might find deployment in shielding charged particle beams in HEP experiments. Another application of interest might be the utilization of meta-materials in instrumentation that has a focus on detecting particles in HEP experiments. Manipulating optical properties of detector media offers the possibility to improve the ability, amongst others, to identify charged particles by means of the Cherenkov effect. One of the media's desired property is to anomalously and largely tune light scattering in an ultra-compact volume. As a consequence, small volumes might be exploited and relatively cheaply and with small efforts implemented. However, a variety of challenges have to be controlled and extensive R&D must be conducted to realize such implementation.
        Speaker: Klaus Dehmelt (Stony Brook University)
        Slides
      • 16:38
        The Snowball Chamber: Using Supercooled Water for Discovering Sub-GeV Dark Matter 17m
        The identification of dark matter is presently one of the greatest challenges in science, fundamental to our understanding of the Universe. In this talk we will present the latest developments in the search for low-mass dark matter with the Snowball chamber. This chamber uses supercooled water as the target, employing an exotic phase transition of metastable water in a similar fashion to a bubble chamber in reverse, but with enhanced low energy threshold (sub-keV) and background discrimination as a function of thermodynamic conditions. We demonstrate that water is supercooled for a significantly shorter time with respect to control data in the presence of neutron sources. Gamma calibration data are indicative of insensitivity to electron recoils inducing the phase transition, making this detector potentially ideal for dark matter searches seeking nuclear recoil alone. The most recent image analysis will be shown with position reconstruction and multiple scattering. We will explore the potential of this new technology to drastically expand detector sensitivity in the sub-GeV range, opening up a new parameter space currently out of reach.
        Speaker: M. Carmen Carmona-Benitez (Pennsylvania State University)
        Slides
      • 16:55
        Results and update from the ABRACADABRA search for sub-$\mu$eV axion dark matter 17m
        ABRACADABRA is an experiment that searches for axion dark matter (ADM) in the $10^{-14} - 10^{-6}\mathrm{eV}/c^2$ mass range. In ABRACADABRA, ADM couples to the static magnetic field of a toroidal magnet. This coupling induces a small, oscillating magnetic flux in the center of the torus that can be measured by a pickup loop connected to a SQUID current sensor. Both broadband and resonant readout modes are possible in the ABRACADABRA design. In this talk we review the ABRACADABRA motivation, concept, and plans. We also present the first results from a one month search for axions with a prototype, ABRACADABRA-10cm. We found no evidence for axion dark matter and set 95% C.L. upper limits on the axion-photon coupling between $g_{a\gamma\gamma}<1.4\times10^{-10}\,\mathrm{GeV}^{-1}$ and $g_{a\gamma\gamma}<3.3\times10^{-9}\,\mathrm{GeV}^{-1}$ over the mass range $3.1\times10^{-10}\,\mathrm{eV} - 8.3\times10^{-9}\,\mathrm{eV}$. These results are comparable to astrophysical constraints in this mass range
        Speaker: Reyco Henning (UNC)
        Slides
      • 17:12
        Fermini: A Fermilab Search for Minicharged Particles and Strongly Interacting Dark Matter 17m
        We propose a low-cost and movable setup to probe minicharged particles (or milli-charged particles) using high-intensity proton fixed-target facilities. This proposal, FerMINI, consists of a milliQan-type detector, requiring multi-coincident (nominally, triple-coincident) scintillation signatures within a small time window, located downstream of the proton target of a neutrino experiment. During the collisions of a large number of protons on the target, intense minicharged particle beams may be produced via meson photo-decays and Drell-Yan production. We take advantage of the high statistics, shielding, and potential neutrino-detector-related background reduction to search for minicharged particles in two potential sites: the MINOS near detector hall and the proposed DUNE near detector hall, both at Fermilab. We also explore several alternative designs, including the modifications of the nominal detector to increase signal yield, and combining this detector technology with existing and planned neutrino detectors to better search for minicharged particles. The CERN SPS beam and associated experimental structure also provide a similar alternative. FerMINI can achieve unprecedented sensitivity for minicharged particles in the MeV to few GeV regime with fractional charge ε=Qχ/e between 10{−4} (potentially saturating the detector limitation) and 10^{−1}.
        Speaker: Dr Yu-Dai Tsai (Fermilab)
        Slides
      • 17:29
        Novel Designs For Few-Photon Detection Based on Quantum and Nanoscale Systems 17m
        Detecting light from the single to the few photon level is important for many applications in science, including quantum key distribution, high-resolution lidar, biology, and high-energy physics. In the past decades, exquisite performance has been reached for new types of photodetectors, including superconducting nanowires, avalanche photodiodes, and those harnessing CMOS technology. Still several fundamental questions remain regarding the ultimate performance that can be achieved, what architecture is needed, and what physical systems could realize these architectures. In this presentation, I will discuss our efforts at developing a new theory and modeling approach to understand the properties of classical and quantum photodetectors from fundamental physics and show how this approach can be used to design new types of detectors with improved performance. Experimental examples of the realization of such detectors will also be presented. Finally, I will end with a discussion of a specific design relevant to high-energy physics: an energy-resolving detector with low jitter.
        Speaker: Dr Francois Leonard (Sandia National Laboratories)
        Slides
      • 17:46
        Effects of energy accumulation in materials: Self-Organized Criticality dynamics in quantum and superconducting detectors. 17m
        Abstract. In materials used for quantum and superconducting detectors several classes of objects demonstrate glass-like behavior at low temperatures. These are non-equilibrium configurations of surface and interfacial charges, magnetic moments of impurities, nuclear dipole magnetic and quadrupole electric moments, quantized vortexes, etc. Electromagnetic signals applied to device and leaking from the hot environment, as well as ionizing radiation, are capable to deposit energy into “glassy” materials. As energy bearing structures interact directly and indirectly through electrons system and lattice deformations, avalanche relaxation processes could be possible - which bring the question about self-organized criticality effects. A review of literature and measurements in detectors at LLNL reveal patterns among ionization detectors backgrounds and noises in superconducting detectors which invited questions about possible effects in materials under energy flow. Side-by side comparison of very different detectors could lead to better understanding of common problems and see how technologies are merging in experiments studying space microwave background, searches for axions and coherent scatter of low energy neutrinos with low and ultra-low temperature detectors. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344; we acknowledge LDRD grant 17-FS-029.
        Speaker: Dr Sergey pereverzev (LLNL)
    • 15:30 18:00
      Liquid Nobles Parallels Hall of Ideas J

      Hall of Ideas J

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Conveners: Dr Jingke Xu (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) , Jonathan Asaadi (Syracuse) , Jonathan Asaadi (University of Texas Arlington)
      • 15:30
        A Global Liquid Argon Dark Matter Search Program 25m
        The Global Argon Dark Matter Collaboration (GADMC) will pursue a sequence of future LAr dual phase TPC detectors to search for WIMPs with sensitivity that surpasses current level by several orders of magnitude, due to LAr technology excellent potential. The first detector in the sequence is the DarkSide-20k two-phase detector, that is getting ready for construction at LNGS. DarkSide-20k will have ultra-low backgrounds and sensitivity to WIMP-nucleon cross sections down to 1.2 x 10^{-47} cm^2 for WIMPs of 1 TeV/c^2 mass with a LAr exposure of 100 t yr. GADMC will also pursue WIMP search below 10 GeV/c^2, by looking for the electroluminescence signal, with another smaller detector developed in parallel, referred to as DarkSide-LowMass and installed at LNGS. This dedicated search will have excellent discovery capability, reaching the so-called neutrino floor in the low-mass search region. A subsequent objective will be the construction of the ARGO detector which will achieve a LAr exposure of 1000 t yr to push the sensitivity to the neutrino floor region for high mass WIMPs. The combination of the three experiments will cover the WIMP hypothesis down to the neutrino floor for masses from 1 GeV/c^2 to several hundreds of TeV/c^2.
        Speaker: Prof. Jelena Maricic (University of Hawaii)
        Slides
      • 15:55
        Towards a Generation-3 Liquid Xenon experiment 25m
        This talk will discuss some of the challenges that face the next generation of dual-phase liquid xenon time projection chambers, and the R&D directions that should be taken to enable such a detector. A generation-3 liquid xenon TPC will follow the current generation of experiments such as LZ and XENONnT, scaling up the mass of the detector to achieve a diverse scientific reach including dark matter direct detection, solar and atmospheric neutrinos, and rare nuclear decays. To sufficiently advance sensitivity, improvements are necessary in xenon purification, radioactive backgrounds, field uniformity, and photon detector sensitivity.
        Speaker: Dr Michael Clark (Purdue University)
        Slides
      • 16:20
        Liquid Noble Bubble Chambers for WIMP and CEvNS detection 15m
        The Scintillating Bubble Chamber (SBC) Collaboration is currently constructing a pair of 10-kg argon bubble chambers for the detection of low-mass (1-10 GeV) WIMPs and coherent scattering of reactor neutrinos (CEvNS). These chambers will be the first physics-scale devices to use superheated noble liquids for the detection of low-energy nuclear recoils. I will review the scintillating bubble chamber technology, including its unique ability to discriminate between electron and nuclear recoils at energies below a keV, and will report on the technical design and construction of the first 10-kg argon chamber. I will describe our plans to calibrate the sensitivity of this device to nuclear recoils down to 100 eV, plans for deployment at SNOLAB for a dedicated low-mass WIMP search, and tentative plans for a reactor CEvNS study.
        Speaker: Prof. Eric Dahl (Northwestern University)
        Slides
      • 16:35
        HydroX: Hydrogen-doped Liquid Xenon to Search for Sub-GeV/c^2 Dark Matter Particles 15m
        Large mass liquid xenon detectors, such as the imminent LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) and XENONnT experiments, are leading the search for dark matter particles with masses above ~5 GeV/c^2. HydroX is a new effort to dissolve hydrogen into liquid xenon to allow experiments such as LZ to probe sub-GeV/c^2 dark matter with both spin-dependent and spin-independent couplings. The use of hydrogen-doped xenon takes advantage of the kinematic matching of the light nucleus to dark matter particles with masses down to ~100 MeV, while retaining the excellent self-shielding property of liquid xenon. This talk will give an overview of the use of dissolved hydrogen in liquid xenon for sub-GeV/c^2 dark matter searches and describe ongoing and planned R&D efforts for HydroX.
        Speaker: Alden Fan (SLAC)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Radon reduction in Dark Matter Detectors 15m
        Radon is one of the most significant terrestrial radioactive backgrounds in multi-ton rare event searches that is continuously emanating from detector components. In order to achieve high detection efficiency for weakly interacting particles such as neutrinos or dark matter, radon contamination must be carefully suppressed. Since radon is a noble atom, it cannot be removed using conventional purification methods such as high temperature getters. Alternative methods, such as distillation towers or charcoal columns have to be employed to either separate radon from other noble elements, or to trap radon atoms long enough for them to decay before leaving the trap. Based on the experience gained from investigating radon reduction using charcoal absorbers charcoal absorbers for the LZ experiment, methods will be discussed for how to reduce radon contamination in G3 experiments.
        Speaker: Dr Lorenzon Wolfgang (University of Michigan)
        Slides
      • 17:05
        Solid xenon as the path to the neutrino floor 15m
        Radon and its daughter decays continue to limit the sensitivity of WIMP direct dark matter searches, despite extensive screening programs, careful material selection and specialized Rn- reduction systems. While these techniques form a basis for rare-event search experiments, we seek an event-level tag of radon daughter backgrounds. For liquid xenon TPCs, a means to obtaining this lofty goal may lie in crystallizing the xenon. Then, experiments would be able to observe each of the decay steps surrounding the problematic radon daughter beta decay isotopes, at a fixed (x,y,z) in the instrument. The constraint of time structure in the decay sequence could allow veto efficiency to approach 100%, with minimal effect on acceptance. In this case, the limiting background for WIMP searches would be neutrinos from the sun and from cosmic ray muons. In this talk, I will argue that an instrumental radon tag in a crystalline xenon TPC may be the quickest path to reaching the neutrino floor and present preliminary results from a solid xenon test stand.
        Speaker: Dr Scott Kravitz (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Measurements of electron emission reduction from grid electrodes in the R&D test platform for the LZ experiment 15m
        The central component of the LZ (LUX-ZEPLIN) dark matter search experiment is a two-phase xenon time projection chamber (TPC) with a 7 tonne active volume currently undergoing construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. Four woven wire mesh grids establish the drift and electron extraction fields in the LZ detector. This talk will describe the production of these 1.5-m diameter grids and the R&D system test platform at SLAC designed to measure electron emission from grids with single electron sensitivity. Electron emission from cathodic electrodes can impact low energy dark matter searches and detector operability, so this talk will also discuss various surface treatments applied to the grids to reduce electron emission and improve the detector sensitivity.
        Speaker: Rachel Mannino (UW Madison)
        Slides
      • 17:35
        CMOS sensor for the cold and tiny 15m
        By leveraging industrial standard CMOS integrated circuit process, we create sensors that directly collect charge in the form of electrons and ions and that work at extremely low temperatures. I'll first introduce a series of sensors called Topmetal that are geared towards measuring charge in gas and liquid media. $80\mu$m pixel pitch and 15$e^{-}$ electronic noise have been demonstrated. Sensor arrays are being developed for neutrinoless double-beta decay search in high-pressure gas such as SeF$_6$ (ion-only mode) and the imaging of x-rays, gamma-rays, and neutrons. I'll also introduce the recent pursuit of CMOS circuitry that can operate below 1 Kelvin. The rapid increase in the scale of deep cryogenic instruments such as CUPID (CUORE Upgrade with Particle ID) for neutrinoless double-beta decay, transition edge sensor for microwave (CMB), and superconducting quantum computer demand a high channel-density solution for readout and control. By placing CMOS ASIC to a colder stage thus closer to the sensors, one could achieve higher system density, lower noise, and shorter feedback path. Early CMOS device characterization at such temperature and future plans will be presented.
        Speaker: Dr Yuan Mei (LBNL)
        Slides
    • 15:30 18:00
      Machine Learning, Trigger and DAQ Hall of Ideas H

      Hall of Ideas H

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Conveners: Isobel Ojalvo (University Wisconsin Madison) , Verena Ingrid Martinez Outschoorn (University of Massachusetts Amherst)
      • 15:30
        Detector Data Acquisition Concepts 25m
        Speaker: Ryan Herbst (SLAC)
        Transparents
      • 15:55
        hls4ml: deploying deep learning on FPGAs for L1 trigger and Data Acquisition 25m
        Machine learning is becoming ubiquitous across HEP. There is great potential to improve trigger and DAQ performance, and potentially in other real-time controls applications. However, the exploration of such techniques within the field in low latency/power FPGAs has just begun. We present hls4ml, a user-friendly software, based on High-Level Synthesis (HLS), designed to deploy network architectures on FPGAs. As a case study, we use hls4ml for boosted-jet tagging with deep networks at the LHC. We map out resource usage and latency versus network architectures, to identify the typical problem complexity that hls4ml could deal with. We discuss current applications in HEP experiments and future applications. We also report on recent progress in the past year on newer neural network architectures such as binary and ternary networks; models with orders of magnitude more parameters; and exploration of more HLS vendor tools.
        Speaker: Sergo Jindariani (Fermilab)
        Slides
      • 16:20
        Machine Learning based algorithm for reconstructing prompt and displaced muons at Level-1 in CMS detector. 25m
        "In order to preserve its ability to do physics at the electroweak scale in the HL-LHC era, the CMS experiment has to maintain low trigger thresholds that are robust against the large number of interactions per bunch crossing expected at the HL-LHC. Specifically, the Level-1 (L1) reconstruction algorithms for prompt muon triggers need significant improvement. Moreover, there is an emerging strong interest in new physics signatures that involve long-lived particles, resulting in the production of highly displaced muons. Machine Learning techniques have been shown to provide significant gains in the performance of offline reconstruction algorithms, and with recent advancements in FPGA technology, some of these algorithms can now be implemented in the L1 hardware. We present here novel techniques to reconstruct both prompt and displaced Level-1 endcap muons using Artificial Neural Network algorithms executed in FPGAs. The presentation will describe the approach we’ve adopted, demonstrating its performance, and show its current implementation in firmware. Plans for larger scale demonstration and integration into the CMS L1 trigger will also be presented. “
        Speaker: Jia Fu Low (University of Florida)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Detect New Physics with Deep Learning Trigger at the LHC 25m
        The Large Hadron Collider has an enormous potential of discovering physics beyond the Standard Model, given the unprecedented collision energy and the large variety of production mechanisms that proton-proton collisions can probe. Unfortunately, only a small fraction of the produced events can be studied, while the majority of the events are rejected by the online filtering system. One is then forced to decide upfront what to search and miss a new physics that might hide in unexplored "corners" of the search region. We propose a model-independent anomaly detection technique, based on deep autoencoders, to identify new physics events as outliers of the standard event distribution in some latent space. We discuss how this algorithm could be designed, trained, and operated within the tight latency of the first trigger level of a typical general-purpose LHC experiment.
        Speaker: Dr Zhenbin Wu (University of Illinois at Chicago)
        Slides
      • 17:10
        Machine Learning-based Trigger for DUNE 25m
        The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a planned, next-generation experiment that will use the liquid-argon time projection chamber (TPC) technology to study three-neutrino oscillations and search for rare physics processes. DUNE will have four far detector modules, each 10 ktons in fiducial mass. From just one of those modules, the TPC raw data will be streamed out of the DUNE detector at a rate faster than 9 terabits per second. The raw data from the detector can be visualized in the form of high-resolution (11.5 megapixels) images, streamed at a frame rate of 67,000 per second. This invites the application of deep neural networks for online or real-time image classification as a trigger method. One of the main physics goals of DUNE is the study of supernova (SN) neutrinos from a galactic or nearby supernova burst, shall that happen during the experiment's lifetime. The rareness of such burst requires an efficient trigger system in DUNE to differentiate a potential SN neutrino event from other backgrounds or noise in the vast data stream. This talk will present ongoing efforts to demonstrate the feasibility of a machine learning-based trigger at DUNE.
        Speaker: Guanqun Ge (Columbia University)
        Slides
      • 17:35
        Accelerated machine learning inference as a service for particle physics computing 25m
        Large-scale particle physics experiments face challenging demands for high-throughput computing resources both now and in the future. New heterogeneous computing paradigms on dedicated hardware with increased parallelization, such as GPUs and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), offer exciting solutions with large potential gains. The growing applications of machine learning algorithms in particle physics for simulation, reconstruction, and analysis are naturally deployed on such platforms. We demonstrate that the acceleration of machine learning inference as a web service represents a heterogeneous computing solution for particle physics experiments that require minimal modification to the current computing model. As examples, we use the ResNet50 convolutional neural network to demonstrate state-of-the-art performance for top quark jet tagging at the LHC. We use heterogeneous hardware on-premises and in the cloud, including GPUs on Google Cloud and AWS and FPGAs on Microsoft Azure, to accelerate inference over CPUs in our current experimental infrastructure by more than an order of magnitude. Deployed as an edge or cloud service for the particle physics computing model, coprocessor accelerators can have a higher duty cycle and are potentially much more cost-effective.
        Speaker: Nhan Tran (Fermilab)
        Slides
    • 15:30 18:10
      Photodetectors: Organic Scintillators Meeting Rooms K-R

      Meeting Rooms K-R

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin

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      Meeting ID: 765 773 9945

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      Conveners: Andrey Elagin (University of Chicago) , paul oconnor (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
      • 15:30
        The Scientific Impact of Water-based Liquid Scintillator Hybrid Detectors 20m
        The development of Water-based Liquid Scintillator could have a significant impact on the sensitivity of future large underground neutrino detectors due to the possibility of building hybrid scintillator/Cherenkov detectors that combine particle tracking with low threshold, improved energy resolution, and low cost. In this presentation the characteristics of such a hybrid detector are discussed, and results from studies of the potential sensitivity of a hybrid detector on long-baseline, solar, supernova, and diffuse supernova neutrino measurements are presented.
        Speaker: Robert Svoboda (University of California, Davis)
        Slides
      • 15:50
        Characterization of water-based liquid scintillator 20m
        A hybrid Cherenkov / scintillation experiment, that can leverage both signals in a single detector, would offer world-leading physics reach across a broad range of topics, from high-energy physics to nuclear and astrophysics. One way to realise such a detector would be the use of water-based liquid scintillator, a powerful target medium that can be tuned to meet the physics goals. In this talk we will present the current status of work to produce and characterise water-based liquid scintillator, and discuss its performance in large detectors.
        Speakers: Prof. Gabriel Orebi Gann (UC Berkeley / LBNL) , Dr Javier Caravaca (UC Berkeley)
        Slides
      • 16:10
        A low-background structural scintillator for rare event physics experiments 20m
        Progress in the fields of neutrino physics and dark matter searches have placed extreme demands for ultra-low background sensitivities. These improvements can be achieved by replacing inactive structural components with transparent, radio-pure plastic scintillators. These structural scintillating components can serve as an active veto, discriminating internal events of interest from external background events. Poly(ethylene-2,6-naphthalate) (PEN) has been identified as an ideal material for structural scintillator components as it has a significant yield strength at cryogenic temperatures, functions as a wavelength shifter for liquid argon-based detectors, scintillating in the 400 nm region. This presentation will describe efforts to produce and characterize low background components for rare event physics experiments and will provide an update on the synthesis efforts of PEN and PEN derivatives at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy.
        Speaker: Dr Michael Febbraro (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 16:30
        Lithium-doped PSD-capable Liquid Scintillator for the PROSPECT Experiment 20m
        Organic scintillators with high light output, pulse shape discrimination (PSD) response and isotope doping are a promising avenue for achieving new levels of sensitivity to low-rate or low-energy processes. For example, 6Li-doped PSD scintillator enabled the PROSPECT experiment to achieve >104 background rejection in detecting MeV-scale reactor antineutrinos at the earth’s surface. When applied in a large underground detector, this technology can enable high-rate solar, atmospheric, and supernova neutrino measurements complementary to those delivered by an underground LArTPC like DUNE. When realized as a solid plastic, it can expand the range of granularity, geometry and portability achievable in hydrogen-rich neutrino targets. PROSPECT is the first modern neutrino experiment using large volumes of aqueous, PSD-capable, doped scintillator as its target/detection medium. As such, PROSPECT leads in advancing worldwide understanding the optical properties, stability, and production procedures for such materials. This talk will focus on describing the formulation, production, and performance of PROSPECT’s liquid scintillator and describe avenues for future R&D.
        Speaker: Dr Pieter Mumm (NIST)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        PSD capable Plastic Scintillators with Li-6 Doping for neutron and reactor antineutrino detection 20m
        In recent years, significant progress has been made at LLNL in synthesizing a new class of plastic scintillators that support Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) and Li-6 doping. A wide range of base solvents and dye have been assessed to improve scintillator detection performance and material mechanical characteristics. Two distinct chemistries have been developed to solubilize Li-6 compounds in organic solvents, in which they are typically insoluble. Elements as large as 40cm have been produced, with efforts continuing to improve manufacturing procedures for larger components. These developments open new opportunities in fast and thermal neutron detection, as well as for reactor antineutrino detectors. Plastic PSD scintillator materials can enable new detector geometries, potentially reduce system complexity, and are straightforward to handle and transport. In this presentation, we will describe the materials and performance metrics. Material performance will be described in the context of a 64-segment Li6-doped plastic scintillator detector with SiPM readout (SANDD) which would have otherwise been difficult or impossible to realize.
        Speaker: Dr Viacheslav Li (LLNL)
        Slides
      • 17:10
        LiquidO: A Novel Detector Technique with Opaque Scintillator 20m
        LiquidO is a revolutionary detection technique, which uses opaque organic scintillator and that consequently departs from the classical paradigm of highly transparent liquid scintillator (LS) detectors that has prevailed for decades. In LiquidO, scintillation light is confined near its creation point by the scintillation light's short scattering length due to the opaque nature and collected by a dense grid of wavelength shifting fibers. The resulting topological information, normally lost in transparent LS detectors, allows for powerful event-by-event particle identification including MeV-scale positrons, electrons and gammas and enables strong background suppression. Another advantage over classical LS detectors is the possibility of loading to unprecedented levels, since the high transparency is no longer required. In this talk, we give an overview of the LiquidO idea. We also show the first results from the 'micro-LiquidO' prototype detector, which provided the proof of principle of the light confinement. We conclude with further R&D plans.
        Speaker: Dr J. Pedro Ochoa-Ricoux (University of California at Irvine)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        The Next Generation Crystal Detectors for future HEP Experiments 20m
        In high energy and nuclear physics experiments, total absorption electromagnetic calorimeters (ECAL) made of inorganic crystals are known for their superb energy resolution and detection efficiency for photons and electrons. A crystal ECAL is thus the choice for those experiments requiring precision photon and electron measurements for their physics missions. For future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers, however, the crystal detectors used in the existing ECALs are either not bright and fast enough, or not radiation hard enough. Inorganic crystals may also be used to construct a Homogeneous Hadron Calorimeter (HHCAL) to achieve unprecedented jet mass resolution by duel readout of both Cerenkov and scintillation light. For such a calorimeter the crystal cost is a crucial issue because of the crystal volume required. This paper reports current status of crystal R&D, and discusses the next generation crystal detectors for future HEP experiments.
        Speaker: Dr Ren-Yuan Zhu (Caltech)
        Slides
      • 17:50
        Progress on a photosensor for the readout of the fast scintillation component of BaF2 20m
        A silicon photomultiplier providing efficient detection of the 220nm fast scintillation component of barium fluoride but blind to the laeger 300nm slow component is under development. Progress on SiPM fabrication and testing will be reported.
        Speaker: Prof. David Hitlin (Caltech)
        Slides
    • 15:30 18:15
      Quantum and Superconducting Detectors Hall of Ideas I

      Hall of Ideas I

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Conveners: Prof. Karl Berggren (MIT) , Dr juan estrada (fermilab)
      • 15:30
        MKIDs for CMB 20m
        Speaker: Adam Anderson
        Slides
      • 15:50
        MKIDs and microwave spectrometry 20m
      • 16:10
        MKIDs for Visible and Near IR Wavelengths 20m
        Speaker: Ben Mazin
        Slides
      • 16:30
        Development of Large Scale CMB Detector Arrays at Argonne 20m
        The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides a unique window on the physics of the early Universe probing a variety of fundamental physics such as primordial gravitational waves and neutrino masses. Many of the advances in the field of CMB science have been enabled by advances in detector technology. Ground-based CMB experiments have seen order of magnitude increases in detector count with each subsequent stage with current stage-3 experiments fielding ~10K detectors. In this talk I will provide an overview of CMB detector development to date at Argonne and discuss ongoing efforts focused on developing detectors for post-stage-3 experiments like CMB-S4.
        Speaker: Tom Cecil (Argonne)
        Slides
      • 16:50
        Readout for Multiplexed Superconducting detectors 20m
        Speaker: Gustavo Cancelo
        Slides
      • 17:10
        Development of a Highly-Multiplexed TES Readout For Low Background Calorimeters 15m
        The last few years have seen rapid growth in the application of quantum based sensors for the study of fundamental physics. In particular, transition edge sensors read out by SQUID sensors have been used extensively to improve the noise resolution of CMB telescopes, X-ray calorimeters, and other microbolometer based experiments. Macrobolometers — bolometers with large masses — are a powerful detection technology for many rare event searches across nuclear and high energy physics and form the basis for several next generation detectors including CUPID, searching for 0$\nu\beta\beta$ decay, Ricochet, studying CE$\nu$NS, as well as searches for low-mass WIMP dark matter. In this talk, I will discuss a low-noise, highly-multiplexed, TES and SQUID based readout being developed for CUPID and Ricochet.
        Speaker: Dr Ouellet Jonathan (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
        Slides
      • 17:25
        Fundamental Cosmology with Next-Generation Superconducting Millimeter-Wave Spectrometers 15m
        Line intensity mapping is an emerging observational technique to measure the large-scale structure of the Universe in three dimensions, traced by a redshifted emission line, without resolving individual objects. Future experiments promise to extend the observable volume beyond the redshift reach of traditional galaxy surveys, improving precision on the LCDM cosmological model and extensions to it. I will discuss the science potential of such experiments, focusing on far-IR lines detectable at millimeter wavelengths. I will then present SuperSpec - a mm-wave spectrometer that performs the spectral separation entirely on a silicon wafer - and our imminent first demonstration at the Large Millimeter Telescope. Finally I will discuss how SuperSpec technology could power future intensity mapping instruments with orders of magnitude more detectors and the sensitivity to constrain the expansion history at high redshift, primordial non-Gaussianity, and features in the primordial power spectrum.
        Speaker: Dr Kirit Karkare (University of Chicago)
      • 17:40
        Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors For Optical Communication, QIS, and Fundamental Science 20m
        Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors (SNSPDs) are the highest performing detectors available for time-resolved single photon counting from the UV to the mid-infrared. In this talk, we will review recent progress in SNSPD technology, including development of SNSPD arrays for the ground receiver of the NASA Deep Space Optical Communication project. We will discuss recent progress including sub-3ps timing jitter, single-photon sensitivity at wavelengths as long as 10 microns, and the development of kilopixel arrays for time-resolved imaging. We will discuss the potential prospects for using these detectors for QIS applications and the search for dark matter.
        Speaker: Matthew Shaw (Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Skipper CCDs for Cosmological Applications 15m
        Cosmic surveys study the fundamental physics governing dark energy and dark matter, which together comprise 95% of the Universe. To expand our knowledge of the dark sector, next-generation cosmic survey experiments will necessarily observe fainter and more distant systems. In this signal-limited regime, readout noise can become a driving factor in observational sensitivity. Skipper CCDs can reduce readout noise by over an order of magnitude by performing multiple reads of the charge in each pixel, while retaining the high quantum efficiency and linear response that cosmic surveys rely on. We present the benefits and challenges of using Skipper CCDs for the next-generation massivly multiplexed spectroscopic surveys.
        Speaker: Alex Drlica-Wagner (Fermilab)
        Slides
    • 18:15 19:30
      Poster Session and Reception Grand Terrace

      Grand Terrace

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
    • 08:00 08:30
      Coffee break
    • 08:30 10:00
      Plenary Townhall: Science and Technologies Meeting Rooms K-R

      Meeting Rooms K-R

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin

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      Meeting ID: 765 773 9945
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      • 08:30
        Higgs+ 15m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
      • 08:45
        Neutrinos 15m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
      • 09:00
        Dark Matter 15m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
      • 09:15
        Dark Energy and Inflation 15m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Exploring the Unknown 15m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
      • 09:45
        Photodetectors 15m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
    • 10:00 10:30
      Coffee break
    • 10:30 12:30
      Plenary Townhall: Technologies and Cross-cutting topics Meeting Rooms K-R

      Meeting Rooms K-R

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin

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      Meeting ID: 765 773 9945
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      • 10:30
        Quantum Sensors 15m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
      • 10:45
        Noble Liquids 15m
        Speakers: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison) , Jonathan Asaadi (University of Texas Arlington)
        Slides
      • 11:00
        Solid State and Tracking 15m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
      • 11:15
        Calorimetry 15m
        Speakers: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison) , Roger Rusack (The University of Minnesota)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Trigger and DAQ 15m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Paper
        Slides
        TDAQ Survey
      • 11:45
        Readout and ASICs 15m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Paper
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Cross-cutting topics 30m
        Speaker: CPAD Submitter (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
    • 12:30 13:30
      Lunch Grand Terrace

      Grand Terrace

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
    • 13:30 16:00
      Liquid Nobles Parallels Hall of Ideas J

      Hall of Ideas J

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Conveners: Dr Jingke Xu (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) , Jonathan Asaadi (University of Texas Arlington) , Jonathan Asaadi (Syracuse)
      • 13:30
        ARIADNE: A 1-ton two phase liquid argon TPC with Novel Optical Readout 25m
        ARIADNE: A 1-ton two phase liquid argon TPC with Novel Optical Readout
        Speaker: Adam Roberts (Liverpool)
        Slides
      • 13:55
        Scintillation Light Detection in SBND 15m
        The Short-Baseline Near Detector (SBND) will be a 112 ton Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC), and will form a part of the Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) program at Fermilab. The SBN will be composed of three LArTPCs (SBND, MicroBooNE and ICARUS) and aims to resolve the eV-scale sterile neutrino short-baseline anomaly. SBND, as the near detector, will observe an unprecedented number of neutrinos due to its proximity to the beam target. One of the major features of SBND will be its state of the art light detection system. The active system will consist of photomultiplier tubes, as well as ARAPUCA and X-ARAPUCA devices, placed behind the wire planes. The light collection system will be enhanced by highly reflective panels covered by the wavelength shifting compound tetra-phenyl butadiene (TPB) inserted into the cathode plane. The combination of the two elements is designed to ensure a high and uniform light yield in the detector. This talk will provide a review of SBND’s light detection system and its enabling potential to the physics contribution to SBN as well as R&D towards the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE).
        Speaker: Mr Vincent Basque (University of Manchester)
        Slides
      • 14:10
        Ion Trapping in Liquid Argon 15m
        Noble liquid detectors are now ubiquitous in dark matter and neutrino physics experiments. The ability to purify the liquid of electronegative contaminants to the extent that electrons liberated by ionizing particles can be drifted over several meters with minimal attenuation, while maintaining the initial spatial orientation of the charge distribution, is now considered routine. With such capabilities in hand, we consider in this presentation the possibility of trapping ions in a liquid argon medium in a highly-localized spatial region for extended durations using the technique of radiofrequency quadrupole, or Paul, traps that is commonplace in mass spectroscopy devices and atomic physics experiments. We will present initial simulations and preliminary designs of such a situation, and introduce motivating ideas for why such an exercise may yield new insights into noble liquid detectors.
        Speaker: Mitch Soderberg (Syracuse University)
        Slides
      • 14:25
        High-pressure gaseous argon in the DUNE near detector 15m
        The DUNE near detector complex will consist of several detectors, one of which is the high-pressure gaseous argon TPC (HPgTPC). As a promising neutrino detection technology, it is well-suited to improve the neutrino-nucleus systematic uncertainties for the neutrino oscillation measurements, as well as to perform a key role as a muon spectrometer for a liquid-argon detector. In this talk, an overview of the on-going HPgTPC R&D efforts in the U.K. and U.S. will be presented.
        Speaker: Prof. Andrew Furmanski (University of Minnesota)
        Slides
      • 14:40
        QPix: Achieving kiloton scale pixelated readout for Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers 15m
        Future long baseline neutrino experiments such as the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) call for the deployment of multiple multi-kiloton scale liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, two detector readout technologies are being studied in large-scale prototype detectors: the single phase (SP) and dual phase (DP) detectors using projective charge readout wire based anode planes. These projective readout technologies come with a set of challenges in the construction of the anode planes, the continuous readout of the system required to accomplish the physics goals of proton decay searches and supernova neutrino sensitivity, and the 2D projective reconstruction of complex neutrino topologies. The Q-Pix concept (arXiv: 1809.10213) is a continuously integrating low-power charge-sensitive amplifier (CSA) viewed by a Schmitt trigger. When the trigger threshold is met, the comparator initiates a ‘reset’ transition and returns the CSA circuitry to a stable baseline. This is the elementary Charge-Integrate / Reset (CIR) circuit. The instance of reset time is captured in a 32-bit clock value register, buffers the cycle and then begins again. What is exploited in this new architecture is the time difference between one clock capture and the next sequential capture, called the Reset Time Difference (RTD). The RTD measures the time to integrate a predefined integrated quantum of charge (Q). Waveforms are reconstructed without differentiation and an event is characterized by the sequence of RTDs. In quiescent mode the RTDs will be evenly spaced with time intervals of seconds between RTDs with an event signaled by the appearance of a sequence of varying $\mu$s RTDs. This technique easily distinguishes the background RTDs due to 39Ar decays (which also provide an automatic absolute charge calibration) and signal RTD sequences due to ionizing tracks. Q-Pix offers the ability to extract all track information providing very detailed track profiles and also utilizes a dynamically established network for DAQ for exceptional resilience against single point failures.
        Speaker: Jonathan Asaadi (University of Texas Arlington)
        Slides
      • 14:55
        Novel VUV Light Detection in pixelated Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers 15m
        Projective readout technologies currently used in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers come with a set of challenges from the construction of the wire planes themselves to the continuous readout of the system required to accomplish the physics goals of proton decay searches and supernova neutrino sensitivity. Additionally, the reconstruction techniques required for these projective readouts become complex and difficult for complex neutrino interaction topologies. As such, research into reading out LArTPC’s using true 3D pixel based schemes has recently garnered a lot of interest. This new charge readout poses a problem for detection of the scintillation light. In the wire based readout, the wires are transparent to the photons and thus photon detectors (PMT’s and SiPM’s) coated in wavelength shifting materials (TPB and PEN) can be deployed. However, pixel planes are opaque to the light and thus other methods of detection may be required. A number of novel ideas could be pursued to allow the pixel design to be an integrated tracking/photo-detector. One such notion is the exploration of coating the dielectric surface with a type of photo-conductor which would respond to the VUV light incident on the surface. When struck by a VUV photon, the photoconductor would have electrons elevated into the conduction band and move in the electric field toward a pixel button. We will present some of these preliminary ideas and initial R&D being done into the realization of such an integrated tracking/photo-detector for pixel based LArTPCs and future plans for testing currently underway.
        Speaker: Elena Gramellini (Fermilab)
        Slides
      • 15:10
        Pixelated LArTPC R&D: LArPix 15m
        Liquid argon time-projection chambers are the primary neutrino detector technology for DUNE. However due to the O(100us) readout time of large LArTPCs, a LArTPC at the DUNE near detector will encounter substantial neutrino interaction pile-up. To overcome pile-up, we have developed a novel 3D pixelated LArTPC based around a custom cryogenic-compatible ASIC called LArPix. The LArPix-v1 ASIC demonstrated the key requirements of the LArPix concept, namely, low power and low noise amplification, digitization, and self-triggered readout at cryogenic temperatures. The upcoming LArPix-v2 chip aims to demonstrate robust, scalable performance in a ton-scale TPC. I will present on the R&D effort targeting a successful LArPix-v2 design and implementation.
        Speaker: Peter Madigan (UC Berkeley)
        Slides
      • 15:25
        Self-Organized Criticality dynamics in low energy threshold ionization detectors. 15m
        Abstract. In experiments aiming to measure interactions at low energies —exemplified by neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering experiments and the quest for light-mass dark matter particles—researchers must understand the underlying noise mechanisms in their detectors. A review of literature and measurements in detectors at LLNL reveal patterns among low-energy detector backgrounds which invite questions about specific effects in materials under energy flow conditions. Residual radioactivity and cosmogenic radiation lead to slow accumulation of energy in detector materials, in the form of long-living excitations and trapped ions. We hypothesize that the relaxation of this energy occurs in a non-equilibrium, punctuated manner, resulting in avalanche-like ionization or scintillation events which mimic the sought for low-energy particle interactions. In dual-phase detectors, solid Xe and Ar are inevitably present in the form of physiosorbed solid films on internal surfaces. As a consequence, effects like thermally stimulated luminescence, thermally stimulated electron emission and related phenomena are embedded in detector’s design. Production mechanisms for excitations and trapped charges, their interactions and avalanche-like destruction processes appear differently in different materials. Nonetheless, a common dynamical model —called self-organized criticality— allows us to identify underlining process and, in some cases, to suppress or mitigate unwanted consequences. Interestingly, a similar model can be applied to quantum and superconducting detectors yielding an unexpected crosspollination between quantum information and high energy physics. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344; we acknowledge LDRD grant 17-FS-029.
        Speaker: Dr Sergey pereverzev (LLNL)
        Slides
      • 15:40
        An impurity concentration model for Liquid Argon Detectors 15m
        For neutrino oscillation experiments such as DUNE that utilize very large volume of liquid argon (LAr) as the detection medium, it is critical to remove and control impurities (such as oxygen, water, etc.) to extremely low levels (<1 ppb) in order to achieve unprecedented energy scale precision. It is thus desired to have a verified mathematical model describing the dynamics of impurity distributions in any LAr detectors. The model presented in this talk considers the full dynamic components influencing the purity performance of a LAr detector, including sources, sinks, and transport of impurities within and between the gas and liquid argon phases. An analytical solution is provided after simplifying the model by ignoring a few components which have least significant influences. This solution predicts a way to measure the ratio of impurity concentrations between gas and liquid argon phases, also known as the Henry’s coefficient. This method is applied on a 20-L LAr multipurpose test stand with gas argon purification and condensation functionalities. The Henry's coefficient for oxygen is extracted to be 0.83 $\pm$ 0.04, which is in good agreement with past measurements. A first measurement of the Henry's coefficient for water is carried out and preliminary result will be presented. Some other aspects about this model will be discussed.
        Speaker: Aiwu Zhang (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
        Slides
    • 13:30 16:00
      Machine Learning, Trigger and DAQ Hall of Ideas H

      Hall of Ideas H

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Conveners: Isobel Ojalvo (University Wisconsin Madison) , Verena Ingrid Martinez Outschoorn (University of Massachusetts Amherst)
      • 13:30
        Challenges and R&D for DAQ in Particle Physics Experiment 25m
        Speaker: Dr Kai Chen (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 13:55
        Particle Flow at 40MHz with the CMS L1 Trigger 25m
        Following the High-Luminosity upgrade to the LHC, the CMS Level-1 (L1) Trigger will be overhauled to allow the efficient selection of diverse physics signatures at 40 MHz in an environment of up to 200 simultaneous proton-proton collisions. The L1 Trigger will combine information from the tracking, calorimeter, and muon systems to establish a list of single-particle candidates for each event using Particle Flow (PF) reconstruction and to suppress pile-up effects with the PUPPI algorithm. A second layer of processing will combine PF+PUPPI candidates intro high-level objects for trigger selection such as hadronic decays of tau leptons, jets, and missing transverse momentum. Further, the existence of particle-level information for the full event will allow the use of complex reconstruction techniques such as Neural Networks in the L1 Trigger to improve identification performance. The L1 PF system will perform these computations within a latency budget of 1.5 microseconds through a system of parallel and pipelined FPGA processing implemented in the ATCA platform. The design and projected performance of the L1 PF Trigger system and algorithms will be described, along with progress toward a demonstration of the system in hardware.
        Speaker: Mr T. Christian Herwig (FNAL)
        Slides
      • 14:20
        Ideas for real-time analysis for HL-LHC using the CMS DAQ system 25m
        The CMS experiment will be upgraded for operation at the High-Luminosity LHC to maintain and extend its optimal physics performance under extreme pileup conditions. Upgrades will include an entirely new tracking system, supplemented by a track trigger processor capable of providing tracks at Level-1, as well as a high-granularity calorimeter in the endcap region. New front-end and back-end electronics will also provide the level-1 trigger with high-resolution information from the barrel calorimeter and the muon systems. We will discuss the feasibility to capture and use this information to perform real-time analysis. Such a system would provide virtually unlimited statistics to study otherwise inaccessible signatures, either too common to fit in the L1 accept budget, or with requirements which are orthogonal to “mainstream” physics, such as long-lived particles. Another interesting possibility could be offered by relatively low-price large 3D XPoint memory, which could be used to increase the buffer space between the event building and the High-Level Trigger (HLT). This would open the opportunity to perform measurements using the full detector information, but which addresses physics channels which do not fit into bandwidth or storage capacity available for offline analysis.
        Speaker: Remi Mommsen (Fermilab)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        The MicroBooNE Continuous Readout Stream for the Detection of Supernova Neutrinos 25m
        MicroBooNE is a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) neutrino experiment located on the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB) at Fermilab. MicroBooNE has two operating readout streams; an externally-triggered stream used for MicroBooNE’s primary research goals to study BNB neutrinos and their interactions on argon, and, in parallel, a continuous stream of data dedicated for the detection of neutrinos from a galactic core-collapse supernova as well as other non-beam related physics. MicroBooNE cannot self-trigger on supernova neutrinos; instead the continuous readout will store the data for a few days and if there is an external alert from the Supernova Early Warning System (SNEWS) for a supernova collapse, the data will be permanently stored, otherwise the data is erased. This talk will focus on MicroBooNE’s continuous readout stream, its successful commissioning and operation.
        Speaker: Iris Ponce (Research Assistant)
        Slides
      • 15:10
        The trigger and real-time reconstruction at LHCb 25m
        In this talk, I will present an overview of the LHCb trigger during Runs I and II, including real-time calibration of the detector, and detail plans for the trigger to be used during Run III of the experiment. For Run III data-taking, the level-0 hardware trigger used in the previous runs has been removed, requiring the first stage of the software trigger to process events at the LHC bunch-crossing rate of 30 MHz. The talk will also highlight the Allen project, which is aimed at implementing this first stage of the trigger on GPUs.
        Speaker: Dr Daniel Craik (MIT)
        Slides
      • 15:35
        The SBND Trigger 25m
        The Short Baseline Neutrino (SBN) program at Fermilab will search for neutrino oscillations occurring over a 600m baseline with sensitivity to $\Delta m^2$ of order 1eV$^{2}$. As the name implies, the Short Baseline Near Detector (SBND), will serve as the near detector for the SBN program and will constrain the systematic uncertainties for the oscillation search by sampling the unoscillated flux of neutrinos 110m from the beryllium target. SBND will enable a sensitive test of the light sterile neutrino hypothesis, aiming either at an unambiguous discovery or a 5$\sigma$ exclusion of the area of 3+1 oscillation parameter space allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE anomalies. SBND is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) with more than 11 thousand channels of charge readout, a complementary Photon Detection System (PDS), and a Cosmic Ray Tagger (CRT). SBND will rely on its triggering system to both reduce data transfer and storage needs and to provide summary information about detector activity in and out of beam spill. The Photon Trigger Board (PTB) is at the heart of this triggering system and is in charge of driving the readout of the PDS as well as the TPC. Access to the CRT, through the PTB, also makes it possible for SBND to trigger on activity uncorrelated with the beam e.g. from crossing muon candidates to aid in calibrating the detector. The PTB itself, is a printed circuit board designed at the University of Pennsylvania and which hosts a System on a Chip (SoC) with an embedded Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). In SBND, this SoC will allow for remote configuration of trigger definitions within the FPGA, and it will transfer subsystem information leading to each trigger decision directly to the data acquisition system to be stored as part of the overall event record.
        Speaker: David Rivera (University of Pennsylvania)
        Slides
    • 13:30 16:10
      Photodetectors Meeting Rooms K-R

      Meeting Rooms K-R

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin

      Remote connection via zoom
      Join Zoom Meeting
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      Meeting ID: 765 773 9945

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      Conveners: Andrey Elagin (University of Chicago) , Junqi XIE (Argonne National Laboratory) , paul oconnor (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
      • 13:30
        Production of Large Area Picosecond Photo-Detectors – LAPPDTM : Status Update. 20m
        Incom Inc is now producing a “baseline” version of the Large Area Picosecond Photo-Detector (LAPPD) – the largest commercially-available planar-geometry photodetector based on microchannel plates (MCPs). It features a stacked chevron pair of “next generation” large area 20 um pore MCPs produced by applying resistive and emissive Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coatings to glass capillary array (GCA) substrates encapsulated in a borosilicate glass hermetic package. The entry window of the detector is coated with a high sensitivity semitransparent bi-alkali photocathode with 350 cm2 detection area. Signals are read out on microstrip anodes applied to the bottom plate. The “baseline” devices have demonstrated electron gains of 107, low dark noise rates (15-30 Hz/cm2), single photoelectron (PE) timing resolution of 52 picoseconds RMS (electronics-limited), and single photoelectron spatial resolution along and across strips of 2.4 mm and 0.76 mm RMS respectively (also electronics-limited), high (up to 28%) QE uniform bi-alkali photocathodes and low sensitivity to magnetic fields up to 0.8 T (no tests at higher field have been performed at this time). A version with a Fused Silica window featuring an extended UV sensitivity photocathode is also being developed. Apart from the “baseline” LAPPDs, Incom Inc. is developing a GEN II LAPPD product line featuring a ceramic package and capacitively-coupled pixelated readout with resistive anode. Several GEN II LAPPD have been produced. Their performance is now being evaluated. An effort has been initiated on the development of a smaller format 10 cm X 10 cm High Rate Picosecond Photo-Detector (HRPPD) that, in addition to all of the LAPPD’s attractive features, would have a fully active area with no x-spacers, even lower sensitivity to magnetic fields with new 10um pore MCPs and sub-mm position resolution with a new style of anode. LAPPDs can be employed in neutrino experiments (e.g. ANNIE, WATCHMAN, DUNE), particle collider experiments (e.g. EIC), neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments (e.g. THEIA), medical and nuclear non-proliferation applications. We report on the recent progress in the production of the “baseline” LAPPD and discuss new developments.
        Speaker: Dr Alexey Lyashenko (Incom Inc.)
        Slides
      • 13:50
        Design of a Dual-Low/Ultra-High Vacuum Facility for Air-Transfer Production of Large-area High-resolution MCP-based Photodetectors at 100 units/week . 20m
        Applications including searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay, stroboscopic methods in neutrino oscillations, flavor/baryon flow and primary/secondary/tertiary vertex identification at future colliders, and low-dose whole-body Positron-Emission Tomography, would benefit substantially from photodetectors capable of covering large areas with psec-level time resolution and sub-mm space resolution. We describe the design of a facility for the batch production of large numbers of highly uniform micro- channel-plate photomultipliers (MCP-PMT) using the “air-transfer” photocathode pro- cess we have demonstrated on single LAPPD^{TM} modules at the University of Chicago. The proposed facility uses dual nested low-vacuum (LV) and ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) systems in a rapid-cycling, small-footprint, scalable batch production facility that is capable of producing 100 8in × 8in photodetectors per week. The system allows the use of O-rings or gaskets rather than the usual UHV seals, full access to the modules for leak-checking before synthesizing the photocathode, and real-time photocathode optimization with feedback.
        Speaker: H.J. Frisch (University of Chicago)
        Slides
      • 14:10
        Application of MCP-PMT/LAPPD for EIC Particle Identification 20m
        The proposed high-energy high luminosity polarized Electron Ion Collider (EIC) will, for the first time, enable three-dimensional (3D) precision imaging of the internal structure of protons and atomic nuclei, revolutionize our understanding on quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The EIC physics program demands excellent tracking resolution and particle identification (PID) coverage over a wide range of momenta to achieve the highest precision. This talk will report the status of the imaging Cherenkov techniques (dRICH, mRICH and DIRC) considered for proposed EIC detector concepts for momentum coverage up to 50 GeV/c. An important challenge for EIC-PID is to provide a reliable highly pixelated photosensor working in high radiation and high magnetic field environment. The recently commercialized Large Area Picosecond Photo-Detector (LAPPD) provides a promising low-cost photosensor solution for the EIC imaging Cherenkov sub-systems. Improvement on the detector design for high magnetic field tolerance, fast time resolution and pixelated readout were performed at Argonne National Laboratory with small form factor MCP-PMT/LAPPDs. The improved design parameters can be directly adapted by industrial partners for low-cost LAPPD fabrications to achieve the required performance.
        Speaker: Junqi XIE (Argonne National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Precision Time-of-Flight System using Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility 20m
        With picosecond level timing resolution and multiple Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors (LAPPDs) in a time-of-flight configuration, pions and kaons may be separated up to 10-20 GeV. A precision time-of-flight system at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) would be a valuable resource to particle physicists that are testing detectors whose response varies with respect to particle species. In this talk, I will describe an LAPPD based time-of-flight setup currently in progress at the FTBF. This setup is both a first characterization of LAPPDs measuring charged particles and a prototype precision particle identification system.
        Speaker: Evan Angelico (University of Chicago)
        Slides
      • 14:50
        Advanced Photon Detection in ANNIE for Next Generation Neutrino Experiments 20m
        The needs of neutrino experiments are accelerating the technical and commercial development of fast-timing photo-detectors, which offer to revolutionize detectors for high-energy particle physics. Large Area Picosecond Photo-Detectors (LAPPDs) bring considerable new capabilities for neutrino reconstruction in Cherenkov and scintillator detectors. LAPPDs are 20 cm x 20 cm flat panel, a micro-channel plate (MCP) based photo-detectors with roughly 50 picosecond single photoelectron (sPE) time resolutions. Their gain characteristics are exceeding 10^7, well comparable with the conventional PMTs. Leveraging this technology to make detailed neutrino measurements, ANNIE will serve as the first demonstration of their impact on physics measurement in a water Cherenkov experiment. Due to their fast timing and powerful imaging capabilities, they can also be used for many applications in nuclear physics, X-ray science, and medical imaging. In this talk, we will discuss efforts towards application readiness of LAPPDs in ANNIE with particular focus on relevance to future neutrino experiments.
        Speaker: Dr Emrah Tiras (Iowa State University)
        Slides
      • 15:10
        Development of Long Life Microchannel Plate Photomultiplier Tubes 20m
        This detector R&D effort focusses on the development of long-life microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) capable of high rate operations. MCP-PMTs typically use two compact lead glass plates with many small holes (pores) ~10 um under high voltage to provide electron multiplying functionality. The compact and segmented MCP-PMTs have the capacity to be photon detection devices of immense utility in high energy physics experiments and elsewhere due to their ability to detect one or more photons with excellent spatial and temporal resolution, and their ability to maintain a high level of performance when subjected to large magnetic fields. Their principal limitation has been a loss in efficiency of producing primary electrons (quantum efficiency) with usage, compromising their ability to operate in high rate environments. This QE degradation is typically attributed to positive ions damaging the photocathode. Attempts to increase the lifetime include ALD (atomic layer deposition) to suppress the emission of positive ions, active ion barriers to keep positive ions from reaching the photocathode, and use of alternative MCP’s that have less positive ion emission. Studies of the after-pulses created by the positive ions and correlations with device lifetime will be discussed, along with a novel non-destructive test for lifetime measurement.
        Speaker: Prof. Andrew Brandt (University of Texas Arlington)
        Slides
      • 15:30
        NuDot: Fast Photodetectors for Double-Beta Decay with Direction Reconstruction 20m
        As neutrinoless double-beta decay searches seek to reach into and beyond the inverted hierarchy regime, new strategies are needed to reject background events in kiloton-scale detectors. In monolithic liquid-scintillator-based detectors, otherwise-irreducible backgrounds like $^8$B solar neutrino scattering could be identified by their event topology using Cherenkov light signals. This technique relies on fast-timing photodetectors and precise DAQ synchronization, an approach that will be demonstrated with the NuDot experiment, a 1-ton prototype that is beginning its commissioning phase at MIT. We will also discuss potential future upgrade paths using LAPPDs, red-sensitive photocathodes, and quantum dot-doped liquid scintillators.
        Speaker: Dr Julieta Gruszko (MIT, UNC Chapel Hill)
        Slides
      • 15:50
        Using Switchable Fluorescent Molecules to Image Tracks and Measure Energy in Large Liquid Double Beta Decay Detectors 20m
        We propose a technique to use switchable fluorescent molecules to image ionization and to measure energy deposition in events in large liquid double beta decay detectors. A charged particle deposits energy in an organic solvent as in liquid scintillators. The excitations transfer energy to the initially non-fluorescent switching molecules and activate them into a fluorescent configuration. The activated molecules can be repeatedly excited by optical photons, yielding many fluorescence photons each before being reset to the inactive configuration. This technique could be applied to generate high-resolution images of events as well as to reject external backgrounds. A region of interest for the readout process would be identified using prompt Cherenkov light. Selective illumination of the region of interest from various angles would allow iterative refinement of first the position and then the detailed structure of the event. The number of activated molecules takes a role analogous to the light yield of a conventional scintillator, providing a measurement of the energy. There exists at least one class of well-studied molecules which may be capable of meeting the requirements of the technique.
        Speaker: Eric Spieglan (University of Chicago)
        Slides
    • 13:30 16:00
      Solid State Tracking Detectors Hall of Ideas I

      Hall of Ideas I

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Convener: Sally Seidel (University of New Mexico)
      • 13:30
        R&D on LGAD Radiation Tolerance: the HL-LHC and Beyond 20m
        Slides
      • 13:50
        From LGADs to AC-coupled LGADs for fast timing applications 20m
        Speaker: Gabriele Giacomini (Brookhaven National Lab)
        Slides
      • 14:10
        Performance of LGADs and AC-LGADs towards 4D tracking 20m
        Speaker: Gabriele D'Amen
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Low Gain Avalanche Detectors: Towards Higher Granularity and Repetition Rate 25m
        Speaker: Prof. Bruce Schumm (UC Santa Cruz)
        Slides
      • 14:55
        Development of a 3D detector on a hydrogenous amorphous silicon substrate 25m
        Speaker: Dr Mauro Menichelli (INFN)
        Slides
      • 15:20
        Feasibility Study of Charge Multiplication by Design in Thin Silicon 3D Sensors 20m
        We report on a novel 3D sensor design, featuring very small inter-electrode distance, aimed at controlled charge multiplication at voltages of the order of 100 V, both before and after irradiation. Moderate gain values of a few units are achieved, which are however sufficient to compensate the loss of charge signal due to the use of thin substrates and to counteract charge trapping effects even after very large radiation fluences. The devices have been studied with the aid of TCAD simulations, allowing the main technological and design issues to be effectively addressed and the performance to be predicted. The first 3D diode prototypes were fabricated at FBK and initial results from the experimental characterization at UNM demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed concept.
        Speaker: Sally Seidel (University of New Mexico)
      • 15:40
        New proton irradiation facility at Fermilab 15m
        Speaker: Petra Merkel (Fermilab)
        Slides
    • 16:00 16:30
      Coffee break
    • 16:30 18:00
      Plenary Meeting Rooms K-R

      Meeting Rooms K-R

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin

      Join Zoom Meeting
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      Meeting ID: 765 773 9945
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      • 16:30
        Development of Barium Tagging: A Background Free Method to Search for Majorana Neutrinos 15m
        A robust observation of neutrinoless double beta decay is currently the most sensitive method to determine the Majorana nature of the neutrino. The detection of the single barium ion produced as a result of the double beta decay of xenon 136 would enable a new class of ultra-low background neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. However, despite 19 years of R&D, a credible method to collect and identify individual barium ions in bulk xenon has remained elusive. The NEXT experiment is exploring the possibility of utilizing Single Molecule Fluorescent Imaging (SMFI), a Nobel prize winning technique, in a High Pressure Gas Xenon (HPGXe) TPC to accomplish this feat. This R&D adapts techniques from biochemistry and microscopy to yield a novel technology with potential to extend the sensitivity of neutrinoless double beta decay searches. We will present on recent developments and current status including the development and testing of custom dry-phase molecules and the resolution of individual ions in a high pressure noble environment.
        Speaker: Mr austin mcdonald (University of Texas at Arlington)
      • 16:45
        The Dichroicon: Spectral Photon Sorting For Large-Scale Cherenkov and Scintillation Detectors 15m
        We introduce a new device, ‘the dichroicon’, that is capable of providing information on photon wavelength in a large-scale neutrino detector. In a Cherenkov detector, photon wavelength carries information about the propagation time from source vertex to photon sensor. Measuring the difference in time between many long-wavelength and short-wavelength photons that lie along a Cherenkov ring provides information about event position, independent from the overall timing and angular information usually used in reconstruction. In a scintillation or water-based scintillation detector, photon wavelength can be used to detect Cherenkov light independently from scintillation light. Future large-scale scintillation experiments like Theia plan to detect both Cherenkov and scintillation light as a way of providing a very broad range of physics with a single detector. In this talk I will present measurements with a prototype dichroicon using both Cherenkov and scintillation sources. We show that photon sorting with the dichroicon works as expected. In addition, we demonstrate discrimination between Cherenkov and scintillation light with better than 90% Cherenkov purity while maintaining a high collection efficiency for the scintillation light.
        Speaker: Mr Tanner Kaptanoglu (University of Pennsylvania)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        High resolution selenium imaging detector for neutrinoless ββ decay 15m
        Speaker: Mr xinran li (Princeton University)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        ARAPUCA light detectors for DUNE 20m
        The idea of the ARAPUCA was proposed in 2015 with the goal of satisfying the need for a device with a good detection efficiency (at the level of few percent) over a large area (tenths of a squre meter or more), for large scale liquid argon experiments. The great novelty introduced by this device is represented by its capability of trapping photons inside a cavity with highly reflective internal surfaces, observed by an array of active silicon sensors (SiPMs). The core of the device is represented by its acceptance window, made by a combination of a shortpass dichroic filter and two different wavelength shifters, which allows the photons to enter the reflective cavity, but not to exit from it. Trapped photons can bunch multiple times on the highly reflective internal surfaces up to being or detected or absorbed, with the net effect of increasing the overall detection efficiency with respect to the case of a bare SiPM array. Two arrays of 16 ARAPUCAs have been installed inside the protoDUNE at the end of 2017 and are still taking data. Preliminary data analysis shows very good performances, in line with the expectatiations. The ARAPUCA design has been recently improved with the introduction of a light guide inside the reflective cavity, which will allow to improve the photon detection efficiency of about 40% (X-ARAPUCA). The X-ARAPUCA currently represents the baseline design for the Photon Detection System of the single phase DUNE far detector.
        Speakers: Ana Amelia Machado, Ettore Segreto
      • 17:35
        Liquid Noble Gas Dual Phase Detectors for Dark Matter Detector 20m
        In this presentation, I will first review briefly the early liquid noble gas R&D work within the ICARUS framework at CERN since 1989. Then I will report a few technical areas related to liquid noble TPC requirement, such as TPC field uniformity, high voltage, cryogenics and purification. I then will summarize the current work aiming at a zero instrumental background detector DarkSide-20k. A 20ton fiducial target liquid argon dual-phase TPC being developed by the global argon dark matter collaboration (GADMC). Briefly, a few new technologies enabling the DarkSide-20k detector, 1. SiPM light sensors, 2. depleted argon from underground sources, 3. 39Ar further reduction facility, ARIA, by cryogenics distillation, 4. ProtoDune cryostat hosting the entire detector system and acting as shield.
        Speaker: Dr hanguo wang (UCLA)
        Slides
    • 18:00 19:30
      Conference Dinner Grand Terrace

      Grand Terrace

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin

      Honoring Wesley Smith on his Panofsky Prize

    • 08:30 09:00
      Coffee break
    • 09:00 10:30
      Liquid Nobles Parallels: Session 1 Hall of Ideas J

      Hall of Ideas J

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Conveners: Dr Jingke Xu (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) , Jonathan Asaadi (University of Texas Arlington) , Jonathan Asaadi (Syracuse)
      • 09:00
        Development of the Light Detector for DUNE 25m
        Development of the Light Detector for DUNE
        Speaker: Zelimir Djurcic (Argonne)
        Slides
      • 09:25
        Performance of the protoDUNE-Single Phase LArTPC 25m
        Performance of the protoDUNE-Single Phase LArTPC
        Speaker: Matt Worcester (BNL)
        Slides
      • 09:50
        Evaluating ProtoDUNE Single Phase Detector Response with a Cosmic Ray Tagger (CRT) 15m
        The ProtoDUNE Single Phase detector is a full-scale engineering prototype for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment that sits under a test beam at CERN. This 770 ton liquid argon time projection chamber has its front and back faces covered by scintillator strips to tag cosmics and calibrate the detector's reconstruction. The talk will discuss the details of tagging cosmics using the strips that form the CRT and how matching tracks between the TPC and the CRT can give a greater understanding of detector response, such as the impact of space charge and the electron lifetime.
        Speaker: Richie Diurba (University of Minnesota)
        Slides
      • 10:05
        Michel electron reconstruction in DUNE 15m
        The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a leading-edge experiment for neutrino science, search for supernova neutrinos, and proton decay studies. The single-phase liquid argon prototype detector at CERN is a crucial milestone for the DUNE that will inform the construction and operation of the first and possibly subsequent 10-kt fiducial mass DUNE far detector modules. In this talk, I will present the current status of reconstructing Michel electrons from cosmic-ray muons in the ProtoDUNE detector. I will also present the preliminary Michel electron energy spectrum. These Michel electrons are distributed uniformly inside the detector and serve as a natural and powerful sample to study the detector’s response for low-energy (tens of MeV) interactions as a function of position. We have developed a selection tool to identify and reconstruct such Michel electrons which could benefit any LArTPC experiment generically.
        Speaker: Dr ALEENA RAFIQUE (Argonne National Laboratory)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:40
      Photodetectors Meeting Rooms K-R

      Meeting Rooms K-R

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin

      Remote connection via zoom
      Join Zoom Meeting
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      Meeting ID: 765 773 9945

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      Conveners: Andrey Elagin (University of Chicago) , Junqi XIE (Argonne National Laboratory) , paul oconnor (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
      • 09:00
        The Physics Potential of Advanced Reactor Neutrino Detectors 20m
        PROSPECT, the Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment, has both carried out a sensitive search for sterile neutrino oscillations as a solution the reactor antineutrino anomaly and made the first modern measurement of the 235U reactor antineutrino spectrum. While no signature of sterile neutrinos has thus far been found, viable oscillation parameter space remains and efforts to understand neutrino mass and search for sterile neutrinos or other BSM phenomena continue as central topics in neutrino physics. By performing future measurements at multiple reactor types and baselines short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments can greatly increase sterile neutrino sensitivity; providing powerful probes of electron-type neutrino disappearance over many decades of neutrino mass difference. The complementary high-resolution antineutrino spectrum measurements at multiple core types attainable by inverse beta decay detectors can yield new handles on nuclear processes taking place in a reactor core and on the nuclear data used to describe these processes, as well as providing reference spectra valuable for other detection channels, such as coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. Finally, measurements at US-based reactors provide opportunities for detector technology development relevant to other US neutrino physics community goals. In this talk, we will overview the unique role that existing and future short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments can play in addressing P5 science drivers.
        Speaker: Prof. Bryce Littlejohn (IIT)
        Slides
      • 09:20
        Design and Progress of the JUNO experiment 20m
        The next-generation experiment JUNO (Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory), expected to begin operation in 2021, will advance the capability of reactor neutrino experiments to determine neutrino mass ordering and precisely measure several neutrino mixing parameters. JUNO also has rich physics programs on astroparticle physics such as supernova-neutrinos, solar-neutrinos and geo-neutrinos, as well as proton decays and other exotic searches. JUNO has one 20-kton liquid-scintillator (LS) antineutrino detector (the central detector), two redundant muon veto systems, complementary calibration systems, and FADC readout electronics system. The designed energy resolution of 3%/sqrt(E) is expected to be achievable with the high photocathode coverage and highly transparent liquids. There are enormous engineering and technical challenges in building a 20-kton LS detector with unprecedented energy resolution. Here the design of JUNO and new technical advances of JUNO instrumentation will be introduced, with particular focus on the progress of central detector, the production and testing of high-efficiency MCP-PMT, strategy for highly transparent and radio-pure liquid scintillator, comprehensive energy calibration program, progress of electronics and veto system, etc.
        Speaker: J. Pedro Ochoa-Ricoux
        Slides
      • 09:40
        Cosmogenic Background Characterization with the PROSPECT Antineutrino Detector 20m
        Cosmogenic backgrounds represent a challenge for many experiments vitally important to achieving P5 science drivers, from on-surface neutrino detectors, such as Fermilab’s SBN Program, to various deep-underground experiments, like DUNE and LZ. Characterization of neutron background is necessary in dark matter and astrophysical neutrino measurements. Neutrons created in beam dump and decay-in-flight neutrino sources also represent a critically under-studied background class that may prove cru- cial in future coherent neutrino scattering, decay-at-rest neutrino, and beam-based BSM measurements. The PROSPECT antineutrino detec- tor is a 4-ton optically segmented liquid scintillator detector deployed on-surface to detect antineutrinos from the High Flux Isotopic Reac- tor. To achieve the on-surface antineutrino measurement, topological event reconstruction and pulse shape discrimination are applicable in the PROSPECT detector. These advantages make the PROSPECT detector well-suited for use in performing precise characterizations of the cosmic backgrounds. Existing PROSPECT deployments and data are currently being used to provide new characterizations of on-surface cosmic neutron fluxes. This talk will describe PROSPECT’s simulation and measurement to characterize the cosmic backgrounds under ∼ 1 m.w.e. overburden.
        Speaker: Dr Xianyi Zhang (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 10:00
        Instrumentation for a Post-reionization Intensity Mapping Survey 20m
        In the next decade several flagship Dark Energy surveys (DESI, EUCLID, LSST) will be nearing completion and interest in a next-generation experiment is increasing. One promising new technique is intensity mapping (IM), which unlike prior surveys uses the redshifted 21-cm emission from neutral hydrogen in galaxies to trace Large Scale Structure in three dimensions. The systematics associated with radio measurements will be highly complementary to those of optical galaxy and CMB surveys, leading to tighter constraints on the standard cosmological parameters characterizing the expansion history and growth of structure. More importantly, the IM approach offers the possibility to probe the largely unexplored Universe in the redshift range 2.5 < *z* < 6, where signatures of modified gravity, early dark energy, and inflation may be detected or constrained. IM surveys thus have the potential to provide evidence of new physics beyond the concordance $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. Intensity mapping uses mass-producible receivers with no moving parts or exotic semi/superconducting components, and piggybacks on the explosive growth of commodity hardware used for wireless telecommunication and high-throughput data processing. With these cost-effective technologies, it becomes possible to to envision building a large interferometric array with massive collecting area, millions of redundant baselines, and raw data rates up to hundreds of Tbit/s. Critical technologies required for such an instrument include triggerless ("streaming") data acquisition, ultra-high bandwidth data links, use of heterogeneous real-time processing (ASIC, FPGA, GPU, CPU), and sub-ps timing distribution, all of which can leverage from current and upcoming research in the other OHEP frontier areas. This presentation will place IM in context with other survey modalities and provide an overview of several current and proposed experiments.
        Speaker: paul oconnor (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 10:20
        Fiber Positioners for Cosmic Surveys 20m
        Imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and LSST record the positions, shapes, magnitudes, and colors in a few filter bandpasses of 0.6B to 4B galaxies. Precision redshifts of hundreds of millions of galaxies are enabled by technologies that allow of to accumulate photons from thousands of individual objects in parallel. More cost-effective, smaller-scale optical fiber positioners will provide increases in multiplex power that are needed for Stage V dark energy research. I will describe the present state of robotic fiber positioner technologies and outline the direction and goals for current R&D.
        Speaker: Dr H. Thomas Diehl (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:45
      Quantum and Superconducting Detectors Hall of Ideas I

      Hall of Ideas I

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Conveners: Prof. Karl Berggren (MIT) , Dr juan estrada (fermilab)
      • 09:00
        High-performance multilayer optical haloscope for a dark photon search 20m
        We present recent results on the design, fabrication and testing of multilayer optical haloscopes integrated with superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors for detecting bosonic dark matter particle candidates. In this scheme, we look for dark matter (such as dark photons) with rest mass energies in the range of meV to 10 eV. Highly uniform dielectric/semiconductor stacks are implemented with sufficient performance to enable sensitivity beyond existing experimental bounds near 800 meV. Optical metrology is performed to verify the uniformity of the stack across a 50 mm wafer. Furthermore, we show engineering solutions to facilitate reliable alignment between the optical system (comprising the dielectric stack, optical lens, and optomechanical components) and the superconducting detector. Finally, we consider future directions for improvements to the overall system.
        Speaker: Dr Jeffrey Chiles (NIST)
        Slides
      • 09:20
        Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors and their performance in strong magnetic fields 15m
        Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPD) have found applications in many fields, including nanophotonics, quantum communication and computing. They feature near-unity quantum efficiency, picosecond timing jitter and GHz count rates, which makes them promising candidates for future nuclear and high energy physics applications. Towards the goal of implementing this technology in conditions common in nuclear physics experiments, we study the performance of SNSPDs in high magnetic fields by implementing superconducting type-II materials with high upper critical fields and critical currents. Using the recently developed ion-beam assisted sputtering method, we fabricate Niobium Nitride SNSPDs on non-epitaxial substrates using a two-step process, and perform optoelectronic characterization across a wide range of magnetic fields. We demonstrate performance with zero dark counts and saturated internal quantum efficiency in fields of up to 8 T for visible wavelength photons with no need for changes to the common meander geometry.
        Speaker: Mr Tomas Polakovic (Argonne National Lab & Drexel University)
        Slides
      • 09:35
        Nanowire Detection of Photons from the Dark Side 15m
        In recent years, the development of fast and low-dark-count single-photon detectors for photonic quantum information applications promise a radical improvement in our capacity to search for dark matter. The advent of superconducting nanowire detectors, which have fewer than 10 dark counts per day and have demonstrated sensitivity from the mid-infrared to the ultraviolet wavelength band, provides an opportunity to search for bosonic dark matter in the neighborhood of 1 eV. These detectors are simple to fabricate and operate, and can be combined with gas cells, dielectric stacks, or combinations of these structures in cryogenic targets, optimized for dark matter absorption. Furthermore, superconducting nanowires can be used as both target and sensor for direct detection of sub-GeV dark matter [1]. In this work, we will combine resonator systems and quantum large-area single-photon detector, to establish a novel paradigm to look for dark matter with rest mass energies in the range of meV to 10 eV. Inherently resonant systems at these energies—narrow molecular absorption transitions [2] and periodically layered dielectric stacks [3] —bring with them a range of advantages: selectivity, control, and natural background reduction. We demonstrate high-performance 400 by 400 μm large-area tungsten-silicide nanowire prototype with 0.8-eV energy threshold with more than 90 thousand seconds of exposure, which showed no dark counts. The future experiment should enable probing new territory in the detection landscape, establishing the complementarity of this approach to other existing proposals. [1] Y. Hochberg, I. Charaev, S.-W. Nam, V. Verma, M. Colangelo, K. K. Berggren, Phys. Rev. Lett. 123, 151802, 2019. [2] A. Arvanitaki, S.Dimopoulos, and K. V. Tilburg, Phys. Rev. X8, 041001, 2018. [3] M. Baryakhtar, J. Huang, and Robert Lasenby, Phys. Rev. D 98, 035006, 2018.
        Speaker: Dr Ilya Charaev (MIT)
        Slides
      • 09:50
        Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors: Applications from the UV to mid-infrared 15m
        We will present recent developments and new applications for superconducting nanowire single photon detectors including integration with ion traps, kilopixel-scale arrays, and optimization for the mid-infrared for applications in molecular spectroscopy.
        Speaker: Dr Varun Verma (NIST)
        Slides
      • 10:05
        Progress Towards Sub-eV Energy Thresholds with SuperCDMS Detectors 20m
        In the last year, SuperCDMS has demonstrated multiple detectors with <3 eV resolution with masses from 0.25 to 10g, and we are operating multiple prototype detectors which we expect to achieve sub-eV resolutions. This is the result of an R&D program to fabricate low-Tc TES readout and improve energy collection efficiency of our devices. In addition, a subset of these detectors has demonstrated <0.01 electron resolution using the NTL voltage gain method at a bias voltage of 250V. I will present these recent results, and discuss the path forward for our R&D program to achieve sub-eV thresholds (resolutions around 100-200 meV) in the near future, as well as the science prospects of running these devices in our low-background underground test facilities, NEXUS and CUTE. I will also talk about the work we're putting in to port our sensor technology from Si to lighter targets, including diamond, SiC, and sapphire (Al2O3), useful for enhanced sensitivity to low-mass particles, and greater radiation hardness.
        Speaker: Dr Noah Kurinsky (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 10:25
        Superconducting microwave resonator in a strong magnetic field for dark matter axion detection 20m
        A high Q-factor microwave resonator in a high magnetic field could be of great use in a wide range of fields, from accelerator design to axion dark matter search. IBS/CAPP in Korea is one of those who would like to enhance the sensitivity to detect dark matter axions by boosting the Q-factor of the resonant cavity, taking advantage of a recent advance of high temperature superconductor (HTS) technology. HTS is a natural choice of superconducting material for the resonator in a high field because of its high upper critical field (~100 T) and strong vortex pinning characteristics. The deposition, however, of a high-quality, grain-aligned HTS film on a three-dimensional surface is technically challenging. We have applied biaxially-textured commercial YBa2Cu3O7−x (YBCO) tapes to the inner surface of a polygon-shaped resonant cavity to overcome this problem. The measurement showed that a clear superconducting phase transition occurred around 90 K and a very high Q-factor of 330,000 (about 6 times higher than the same size cavity with OFHC Cu) at 4 K at 6.93 GHz (TM010 mode) was maintained even in a high magnetic field of 8 Tesla. We demonstrated that the high Q-factor of the superconducting YBCO resonant cavity showed no significant degradation from 1 T up to 8 T with our technique. This is the first indication of the possible applications of HTS technology to the research areas requiring a strong magnetic field at high radio frequencies.
        Speaker: Dr Woohyun Chung (IBS/CAPP)
        Slides
    • 09:00 10:35
      Solid State Tracking Detectors Hall of Ideas H

      Hall of Ideas H

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Convener: Sally Seidel (University of New Mexico)
      • 09:00
        Chronopixel CMOS Sensor Development for the ILC 25m
        James Brau, Nikolai Sinev, David Strom University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon Oliver Baker, Charles Baltay, Christian Weber Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut A monolithic CMOS pixel detector with time-stamping capability (Chronopixel) has been developed based on design goals of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Each hit is accompanied by a time tag with sufficient precision to assign it to a particular ILC bunch crossing - thus the name Chronopixel. This reduces the occupancy to negligible levels, even in the innermost vertex detector layer, yielding a robust vertex detector which operates at background levels significantly in excess of those currently foreseen for the ILC. The Chronopixel can record and store time stamps for two hits in each pixel while using standard CMOS processing for manufacturing. Following two earlier prototype fabrication runs and tests, a third prototype design was developed to resolve earlier issues, including a high capacitance problem. This problem was traced to the TSMC 90 nm technology design rules, which led to an unacceptably large value of the sensor diode capacitance. Six different layouts for the sensor diode were tested in the third prototype, and tests demonstrated that the high capacitance problem was solved. The third prototype has also been exposed to HL-LHC radiation levels; results of these tests are also presented.
        Speaker: James Brau (University of Oregon)
        Slides
      • 09:25
        RD53 Status 25m
        The readout circuit (RD53B) for the pixel detector is a joint effort by both the ALTAS and CMS experiments by the RD53 collaboration. In this talk I will give the status of the RD53 collaboration work on the design and verification of RD53B. Using 65nm technology and spanning a 384x400 pixel matrix expecting a maximum hit-rate of 3 GHz/cm2, this chip is the most complex ASIC designed for particle colliders. With 22 collaborating institutes, a solid verification framework is essential in the proper testing of the chip design and ensuring the success of the project. Verification Engineering, as a means of testing the design of an integrated circuit before it is sent to be fabricated en masse, is considered a critical part of the design life cycle. Verification is used to identify and eliminate serious bugs in a design that can lead to increase in cost of the design process as well as delaying significantly design submission and physical testing. To this end the Universal Verification Method (UVM) created to be used by all major Electrid Design Automation (EDA) companies is implemented to measure the chip design meets specification. This spans from writing tests to probe digital logic to simulating power consumption at the per chip level.
        Speaker: Cesar Gonzalez Renteria (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 09:50
        Modelling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector 20m
        Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Given their close proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be exposed to an unprecedented amount of radiation over their lifetime. The current pixel detector will receive damage from non-ionizing radiation in excess of $10^{15}$ $1$ MeV neq cm$^2$, while the pixel detector designed for the high-luminosity LHC must cope with an order of magnitude larger fluence. This paper presents a digitization model incorporating effects of radiation damage to the pixel sensors. The model is described in detail and predictions for the charge collection efficiency and Lorentz angle are compared with collision data collected between 2015 and 2017 ($10^{15}$ $1$ MeV neq cm$^2$).
        Speaker: Aidan Grummer (University of New Mexico)
        Slides
      • 10:10
        Tracking and Timing with Induced Current Detectors 25m
        Technologies such as 3D electronics/sensor integration and CMOS-based pixel sensors, combined with continued scaling of CMOS electronics has enabled detectors with small pixels with low power and very low load capacitance. This low capacitance and associated fast response allows us to use information from transient current signals rather than the normal fully integrated charge. In a detector with small pixel pitch/thickness these signals can provide prompt timing information from pixels that normally integrate to zero charge. Detailed information about tracks, such as angle and time, can be extracted from a single layer. Fast timing can also be achieved for x-ray detectors in thick silicon, eliminating the need for stacks of thin detectors for some timing applications. We will discuss studies of some possible configurations as well as possible demonstration projects.
        Speaker: Dr Ronald Ronald Lipton (Fermilab)
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Coffee break
    • 11:00 12:30
      Liquid Nobles Parallels Hall of Ideas J

      Hall of Ideas J

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Conveners: Dr Jingke Xu (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) , Jonathan Asaadi (Syracuse) , Jonathan Asaadi (University of Texas Arlington)
      • 11:00
        The NEXT Experiment 25m
        The NEXT collaboration is pursuing a program of high pressure xenon gas experiments with the goal of mounting sensitive, ultra-low background, ton-scale searches for neutrino less double beta decay. This talk will present recent results from the presently running NEXT-White demonstrator, a status update on construction of NEXT-100, and a discussion of the future ton-scale phases. We will also discuss the latest R&D for the NEXT program including studies of diffusion-reducing gas mixtures and the development of barium ion tagging based on single molecule fluorescence imaging.
        Speaker: Dr Jones Ben (UTA)
        Slides
      • 11:25
        Neutrinoless double beta decay with nEXO 25m
        Neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay is a process in which a nucleus (A,Z) decays to (A,Z+2) with the emission of two electrons (but no neutrinos). Experimental searches for such a decay are the most sensitive test of lepton-number conservation and its discovery would unambiguously prove the Majorana nature of neutrinos, with profound implications for cosmology in addition to particle and nuclear physics. This process is also a sensitive probe of the absolute neutrino mass scale. EXO (Enriched Xenon Observatory) is an experimental program searching for 0νββ decay of 136Xe. After a successful 200-kg experiment (EXO-200), a next generation experiment, nEXO, is proposed and in advanced design phase. nEXO is a 5-tonne liquid xenon TPC with a sensitivity to the 0νββ decay half-life of 136Xe of ~10^28 years. It builds on the EXO-200 experience while introducing novel technical solutions, such as the use of VUV-sensitive silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) placed behind an optically open electric filed shaping electrode structure, a novel planar tiled charge collection system, in-xenon low-radioactivity cryogenic read out electronics, and minimal use of plastic materials to minimize the outgassing of electronegative impurities into the LXe volume. This talk introduces the physics case for the investigation of neutrinoless double beta decay and overviews the nEXO design, technology, and expected sensitivity.
        Speaker: Andrea Pocar (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
        Slides
      • 11:50
        The COHERENT Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source 15m
        The first observation of coherent elastic neutrino nuclear scattering (CEvNS) was recently made by the COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This basic interaction now lays the foundation for a new era of compact neutrino detectors while providing a new probe of physics topics including electromagnetic properties, searches for physics beyond the standard model, and nuclear form factors. The Spallation Neutron Source is ideally suited for not only CEvNS studies but also a broader set of high-precision neutrino physics measurements and dark matter searches due to the accelerator's intensity, pulsed-structure, and proton beam-energy. Novel detectors with both low thresholds and good energy resolution are required to realize the full potential of this new neutrino laboratory. The experimental features of this new capability at ORNL as well as the performance of our operating and and future detectors will be discussed.
        Speaker: Dr Jason Newby (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 12:05
        Updates and Status of the Noble Element Simulation Technique 15m
        The Noble Element Simulation Technique (NEST) is a comprehensive mostly-empirical standalone package for complete and accurate simulation of both the scintillation and ionization response of noble element detectors. For liquid xenon detectors, NEST includes models of recombination fluctuations and mean yields for nuclear recoils, electron recoils, Krypton-83m events, alphas, and heavy ions. Additionally, similar models for liquid argon detectors are currently in development. The current version of NEST (v.2.0) is accessible via an online calculator, a C++ based executable, as well as Python and Geant4 integrations. In this presentation, we give the current status of the ongoing updates to the NEST package and discuss unresolved discrepancies in world data.
        Speaker: Dr Jon Balajthy (UC Davis)
        Slides
    • 11:00 12:30
      Photodetectors Meeting Rooms K-R

      Meeting Rooms K-R

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin

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      Conveners: Andrey Elagin (University of Chicago) , Junqi XIE (Argonne National Laboratory) , paul oconnor (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
      • 11:20
        Improving the light collection efficiency of silicon photomultipliers through the use of metalenses 20m
        Metalenses are optical devices that implement nanostructures as phase shifters to focus incident light. Their compactness, simple fabrication and low cost make them a novel viable solution for increasing light collection efficiency in particle detectors with limited area coverage by light sensors. We report on the performance of metalenses in increasing the light collection efficiency of silicon photomultipliers of various sizes and find a five-fold increase in signal for a 1.3x1.3 mm$^{2}$ SiPM when coupled with a metalens of a 10 mm diameter. Our results are found to be in agreement with the light transmission characterization of the metalenses and geometrical considerations such as the focused beam profile.
        Speaker: Mr Alvaro Loya Villalpando (Harvard University)
        Slides
      • 11:40
        Nanoparticle-enhanced photosensors for UV light detection 20m
        Many current and future elementary particle physics experiments require detection of light emitted in the UV wavelength range. This includes neutrino experiments in liquid Argon (128 nm scintillation) or water (~200 nm Cerenkov), dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments in gaseous or liquid Xenon (175 nm scintillation) and calorimetry with crystals in g-2 (PbF2 Cerenkov) and Mu2e (220 nm scintillation in BaF2) among others. Wavelength shifters must be used to convert the generated UV light into detectable wavelengths. Recently, by producing materials whose fundamental particle size is smaller than the electron wavelength in the material, the photo absorption and emission properties of the material can be modified to accommodate UV light detection with existing (visible-sensitive) photosensors. Sizes are typically required to be in the 1- 100 nm range, thus the label nanoparticles. A material nanoparticle in which all 3 spatial dimensions are smaller than the electron wavelength is called a “Quantum Dot”. Since the modified detection properties of nanoparticles result from changes in individual atoms or molecules, it is anticipated that light detection with nanoparticles is stronger, faster, and more efficient than bulk material wavelength shifters (e.g., TPB). At ANL, we have initiated testing of nanoparticle types with the goal of developing coatings and/or inserts that absorb a desired wavelength and then re-emit the absorbed energy in a longer wavelength tuned to the peak sensitivity of an existing selected photosensor. In all, about a dozen different nanoparticle types have been tested in several configurations - over half have shown response in the UV wavelength range with emission detectable by visible-sensitive silicon photomultiplier sensors. Applications are not limited to HEP experiments - other possibilities include enhanced vision in low light conditions and in interior spaces through windows and skylights, more efficient use of natural light for photosynthesis and extension of visible astronomy into the UV region to investigate e.g., galaxy formation.
        Speaker: Dr Stephen Magill (Argonne National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Novel Small-Gap Materials as Photodetectors 20m
        For decades, we have used materials with sub-eV bandgaps as avalanche photo-diodes, with smaller gap materials allowing for detection of longer wavelength light. These applications have been largely restricted to high-power detection due to high dark rates observed in these detectors at room temperature. Recent progress has been made reducing the dark current by cooling these APDs to LN2 temperatures, at the expense of gain, as the avalanche process and dark rate processes are both temperature dependent. In the meantime, silicon detectors have achieved single-charge resolution at sub-K temperatures using phonon readout, and charge readouts of ~30 electrons have been achieved in monolithic devices. We propose a two-step process to capitalize on these gains for low-gap materials by first testing conventional materials at sub-Kelvin temperature, using these new readout techniques, and then using newly discovered low-gap materials (e.g. ZrTe5) to continue to push thresholds lower. We expect that these materials will either operate as high-gain APDs or highly insulating monolithic crystals; in either case, they are low-lying fruit for low-threshold photon detection, and they make attractive targets for rare-event searches with sub-eV energy depositions, such as keV-MeV mass dark matter searches with unprecedented sensitivity.
        Speakers: Prof. Jeffrey Filippini (UIUC) , Dr Noah Kurinsky (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory)
        Slides
    • 11:00 12:45
      Quantum and Superconducting Detectors Hall of Ideas I

      Hall of Ideas I

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Conveners: Prof. Karl Berggren (MIT) , Dr juan estrada (fermilab)
      • 11:00
        Microwave Photon Counting with Josephson Junctions 20m
        The Josephson photomultiplier (JPM) is the microwave-frequency analog of the avalanche photodiode: absorption a single photon induces a transition between distinct macroscopic states, resulting in an easily measured “click”. In the most common implementation, the junction plasma resonance is tuned to the desired detection frequency, and photon absorption enables a tunneling transition between distinct circulating current states in an rf SQUID loop. We have used the JPM to perform fast, high-fidelity quantum nondemolition measurement of a superconducting qubit. Here we map the qubit state to bright and dark microwave pointer states in a linear cavity. The JPM detects the presence or absence of photons, projecting the qubit into the appropriate computational basis state. Crucially, the approach provides access to the classical bit that is the result of projective quantum measurement at the millikelvin stage, without the need for quantum limited amplification of the measurement tone or heterodyning and thresholding at room temperature.
        Speaker: Prof. Robert McDermott (UW-Madison)
      • 11:20
        Superconducting Qubits for an Axion Search 20m
        Speaker: Akash Dixit (University of Chicago)
        Slides
      • 11:40
        HeRALD: Dark Matter Direct Detection with Superfluid 4He 15m
        HeRALD, the Helium Roton Apparatus for Light Dark Matter, will use a superfluid 4He target to study the sub-GeV dark matter parameter space. The HeRALD design is sensitive to all signal channels produced by nuclear recoils in superfluid helium: singlet and triplet excimers, as well as phonon-like excitations of the superfluid medium. Excimers are detected via calorimetry in and around the superfluid helium. Phonon-like vibrational excitations eject helium atoms from the superfluid-vacuum surface which are detected by adsorption onto calorimetry above the surface. I will discuss the design, sensitivity projections, and ongoing R&D for the HeRALD experiment.
        Speaker: Harold Pinckney (University of Massachusetts)
        Slides
      • 11:55
        Dark Matter and Fundamental Physics Searches using Atomic Magnetometers 15m
        Atomic magnetometers based on lasers and alkali-metal vapor cells are currently the most sensitive non-cryogenic magnetic-field sensors. Because of high sensitivity and simple turn-key operation, atomic magnetometers benefit many applications, including biomedical imaging and fundamental physics. In this talk, we will present the recent activities on dark matter and fundamental physics searches using atomic magnetometers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our research has a great potential to address some of the biggest unsolved mysteries in modern physics – the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the existence of dark matter making up more than 80% of matter in the Universe. Our experiments aim to search for new fundamental bosons, such as axions, at light masses lower than meV. They use new detection concepts based on atomic magnetometers via observable effects induced by new bosons coupled with Standard Model particles. These include the detection of (1) effective magnetic field induced by exotic interactions between particles mediated by new bosons; (2) oscillating magnetic field induced by the interaction between axions and magnetic fields. Due to the use of atomic magnetometers, our experiments are relatively small projects at low cost.
        Speaker: Dr Young JIn Kim (Los Alamos National Laboratory)
        Slides
    • 11:00 12:30
      Solid State Tracking Detectors Hall of Ideas H

      Hall of Ideas H

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
      Convener: Sally Seidel (University of New Mexico)
      • 11:00
        Status and Plans of the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter Upgrade Project 20m
        The High Luminosity extension of the LHC program (HL-LHC) will impose in an order of magnitude larger radiation levels and pile-up conditions in CMS. To cope with the challenges, the endcap calorimeter of CMS will be replaced with a highly granular imaging calorimeter (HGCal). It will use about 6 million silicon diode based channels of 0.5-1 cm$^2$ size and about four hundred thousand scintillator tiles read-out directly by silicon photomultipliers. In addition to measuring the energy and position of energy deposits, the time of arrival will be measured with a precision of 50ps to separate interactions within the same bunch crossing. We will present the main design concepts of the detector, the status of the project and the future plans.
        Speaker: Zoltan Gecse (Fermilab)
        Slides
      • 11:20
        Large-area Si(Li) detectors for X-ray spectrometry and particle tracking for the GAPS experiment 20m
        Novel large-area lithium-drifted silicon (Si(Li)) detectors have been developed for the General Antiparticle Spectrometer (GAPS) Antarctic balloon mission. GAPS will search for antinuclei signatures of dark matter using a novel detection technique based on exotic atom capture and decay. As the GAPS instrument will require ~10 square-meters of instrumented silicon in order to achieve sensitivity to rare antideuteron events, the successful development of a novel high-yield fabrication process has been critical. We demonstrate here that the resulting 10 cm-diameter, 2.5 mm-thick, 8-strip detectors provide the necessary <4 keV (FWHM) energy resolution for X-rays and <10% energy resolution for heavy particle tracks, while operating in conditions (~−40 C and ~1 Pa) achievable on a long-duration balloon carrying a large-acceptance detector payload. Mass production and calibration of >1000 detectors has begun for the first GAPS flight, scheduled for late 2021. The detectors, while developed specifically for GAPS, have other potential applications, e.g., in heavy nuclei identification at rare isotope facilities such as NSCL/FRIB. Leveraging the success of the Si(Li) development program to further improve detector cost, X-ray resolution, and tracking efficiency would open the door to drastically improved sensitivity to cosmic antiprotons, antideuterons, and antihelium as signatures of dark matter.
        Speaker: Field Rogers (MIT)
        Slides
      • 11:40
        Scintillation detector based on InAs quantum dots in a GaAs semiconductor matrix for charged particle tracking: first measurements of the response to alpha-particles 20m
        We measured response to 5.5 MeV alpha particles of a 20 um thick integrated scintillating detector based on InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded into GaAs matrix. The operational principle of the tested detector is as follows: photons emitted by InAs QDs have energy lower than the GaAs bandgap, which makes the GaAs bulk transparent to the QD emission. The QD emission is detected by a 1 um thick InGaAs photodiode, integrated with the scintillator. The detector has been successfully operated in a photo-voltaic, or zero-bias mode, without an external bias voltage applied to the photodiode. Compared to one of the best inorganic scintillators, LYSO, a QD/semiconductor-based scintillator has about 5x higher light yield (~240,000 photons/MeV), and ~ 40x faster decay time (1 ns). That should result in the timing resolution of 1-10 ps, energy resolution close to 1% at ~1 MeV at room temperature, and counting rates > 100 MHz per readout channel. We present measurements of the energy response, attenuation length, estimates of the expected timing resolution, and discuss radiation hardness. Produced in thin films, QD-based scintillating detectors could provide an interesting solution for low mass solid-state tracking of charged particles in high-rate experiments which require an excellent timing resolution and coordinate resolution of the order of 100 um. Their ability to operate without an external bias makes such detectors very distinct from widely used in HEP Si detectors.
        Speaker: Pavel Murat (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory)
        Slides
    • 12:30 13:30
      Lunch Grand Terrace

      Grand Terrace

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin
    • 13:30 16:00
      Plenary Meeting Rooms K-R

      Meeting Rooms K-R

      Monona Terrace Convention Center

      Madison, Wisconsin

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      Meeting ID: 765 773 9945
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      • 13:30
        Liquid Noble Detector Summation 15m
        Speakers: Dr Jingke Xu (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) , Jonathan Asaadi (University of Texas Arlington) , Jonathan Asaadi (Syracuse)
        Slides
      • 13:45
        Machine Learning, Trigger and DAQ Summation 15m
        Speakers: Isobel Ojalvo (University Wisconsin Madison) , Verena Ingrid Martinez Outschoorn (University of Massachusetts Amherst)
        Slides
      • 14:00
        Quantum and Superconducting Detector Summation 15m
        Speakers: Prof. Karl Berggren (MIT) , Dr juan estrada (fermilab)
        Slides
      • 14:15
        Photodetector Summation 15m
        Speakers: Andrey Elagin (University of Chicago) , Junqi XIE (Argonne National Laboratory) , paul oconnor (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Solid State and Tracking Detector Summation 15m
        Speaker: Sally Seidel (University of New Mexico)
        Slides
      • 14:45
        Diverse Detector Summation 15m
        Speaker: Kimberly Palladino (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        CPAD Closeout 30m
    • 15:30 16:30
      Coffee break